University of the Rockies - Course Descriptions

University of the Rockies - Course Descriptions

Section Ten: Course Descriptions

Not all courses are offered in all modalities or with the same frequency. Please reference the Degree Programs and Graduate Certificates section of this Catalog to find a list of courses offered and/or required in each degree program.


Course Numbering System

The following offers a general correlation between course levels and numbers:

Course Levels Course Number Range

Master’s Level               5000-6000

Doctorate Level             7000-8000

University of the Rockies awards semester credit hours.


CSL Counseling

CSL 5101 Professional Orientation & Issues in Counseling     3 credits
This course provides an overall orientation to the counseling profession, including the professional roles, functions, and relationships that counselors hold, counseling practice, history of the discipline, licensing, professional organizations within the discipline, and contemporary issues in the field.

 

CSL 5130 Life Span Development     3 credits
This course surveys the major theoretical perspectives on life span development from conception through late adulthood. Developmental processes related to physical, cognitive, moral, and emotional functions are reviewed as well as societal and cultural aspects of development. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 5130.

 

CSL 5280 Ethics, Laws & Standards of Professional Practice     3 credits
This course is a study of the ethical and legal issues confronting those practicing in human services. Topics related to clinical methodology, standards of practice, and inter-professional relations are explored. Students learn principles of ethical decision making, standards for human and animal use in research, and standards of care specified by state and federal laws. Emphasis is placed on exploration of the emotional impact that major ethical and legal dilemmas have on decision making. Students also master the current code of ethics of the American Psychological Association and other professional codes of ethics, such as the code of the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy or the code of the American Counseling Association. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 5280/ORG 6520. This course may not be transferred in.

 

CSL 5290 Theories & Techniques of Counseling & Psychotherapy     3 credits
This course is an overview of the psychodynamic, cognitive/behavioral, and existential/humanistic schools of psychology, as well as corresponding models of counseling and frequently used assessment and therapeutic techniques. The primary focus in the course is on the development of both skills and rationale in the application of intervention strategies to treatment and case management. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 5290.

 

CSL 5330 History of Psychology     3 credits
This course introduces students to the theoretical systems, methods of inquiry, and terminologies associated with the history of psychology. The course is grounded in a broad historical understanding that builds a framework for understanding the contemporary field of psychology. The focus is on the major systems of Associationism, Structuralism, Functionalism, Behaviorism, Gestalt, Psychodynamic, and Existential/ Humanistic. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 5330.

 

CSL 5400 Statistics & Research Design     3 credits
This course emphasizes statistical concepts related to methods most appropriate to data and theories in psychology. The focus is on a quantitative approach to the concepts and methods of statistical inference. Topics include sampling, frequency distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and probability. Statistical analyses covered include correlation, regression, t-tests, nonparametric tests, and Analysis of Variance. Basic research design issues are addressed, with a focus on selecting data analysis techniques to appropriately address research questions and apply the concepts covered to various psychological problems and real life situations. Emphasis is on developing skills in interpreting statistical results presented in research articles. Cross-listed as and equivalent to ORG/PSY 5400.

 

CSL 5410 Physiological Bases of Behavior     3 credits
This course is designed to provide the student with a foundation of human physiology including the nervous, hormonal, reproductive, and sensory systems, and the attendant functions of digestion, sleep, learning and memory, emotion and other human biological functions. The course provides an essential knowledge base for most other offerings in the field of psychology. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 5410.

 

CSL 5420 Principles of Social Psychology     3 credits
This course provides an introduction and overview of the principles and theories of social psychology. The course includes exploration of behavior in groups, group impacts on individual behavior and the ways in which organizational rules and norms impact behavior. Constructs of social psychology, including social influence, social thinking, and attitude formation are covered and related to sociological and psychological research. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 5420. Equivalent to ORG 5520.

 

CSL 5530 Cultural Diversity & Individual Differences     3 credits
This course provides a systematic review of the wide range of cultures and individual differences and the ways in which cultural mores, ethnocentrism, and factors such as matters of race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, customs and cultures impact behavior of the individual themselves and of those around them. Through this course, students better understand themselves and others, in terms of perceptions and behaviors. Equivalent to HUM 6500. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 5530/ORG 6499/EDU 6499.

 

CSL 5610 Psychometrics: Tests & Measurements     3 credits
This course involves the study of the theory and practice of psychological measurement. The focus is on the process of measuring and differentiating variables of psychological interest. Students explore basic concepts of measurement and the principles of test construction. The course familiarizes the prospective professional psychologist with the common tests used in psychological and educational practice. These include intellectual, aptitude, and achievement tests; interest inventories; personality tests; and social measures. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 5610/ORG/PSY 5100.

 

 CSL 6120 Lifestyle & Career Development     3 credits
This assessment course focuses on the evolution of the concept of career development. Students review the major theories and their application to the collection, evaluation, and use of career information for counseling psychology as it applies to individuals and groups across the adult life span. Students also learn to use assessment instruments (MBTI, FIRO-B, Strong, etc.) and integrate the findings in vocational counseling situations as they relate to adults. Cross-listed and equivalent to ORG/PSY 6120.

 

CSL 6140 Assessment of Children & Adolescents     3 credits
This course involves the study of the theory and practice of behavioral and diagnostic assessment of children and adolescents. The course focus is on how behavioral assessment is used to provide information in educational, psychiatric, and neurological practice. Primary emphasis is on adaptive behavior, anxiety, depression, trauma, and learning problems associated with children and adolescents. The student gains familiarity with numerous evaluation instruments and techniques used with children with behavioral, emotional, and learning problems. Prerequisite: CSL 5610. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 6140.

 

CSL 6160 Family Systems & Dynamics     3 credits
This course is an introduction to the systems approach to intervention with families. It includes a historical perspective on family theory development. The focus is on obtaining knowledge and theory about the nuclear family in traditional and alternative forms. Normal family patterns of interaction, family life cycle, family of origin, family subsystems, and societal influence are explored. Contemporary issues and outcome research literature are reviewed. This course serves as a knowledge base for further study of assessment, treatment, and intervention with families. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 6160.

 

CSL 6210 Survey of Psychopathology     3 credits
This course includes an examination of DSM criteria for each disorder listed, differential diagnoses, and etiological theories as revealed in the most recent research in the field. Students become acquainted with the most efficacious treatment options and have an opportunity to review and analyze the techniques that lead to successful outcomes with clients. 

 

CSL 6220 Family/Marital Assessment     3 credits
This course covers assessment goals related to treatment strategies, assessment techniques, and assessment instruments used in working with couples and families. Guided practice in selecting, administering, scoring, and interpreting assessment techniques and instruments is provided. Prerequisite: CSL 5610. 

 

CSL 6230 Treatment of Family Violence     3 credits
This course explores the major personal and social theories of family violence, including elder abuse. The course focuses on severe marital conflicts, rape, and physical and emotional violence. The cycle of family violence is examined with emphasis on societal factors that contribute to this behavior. Students explore causality and treatment alternatives for victims and perpetrators as well as current research findings in the field. Prerequisite: CSL 6160. 

 

CSL 6370 Addiction Counseling     3 credits
This course addresses the basic models and theories of addiction, substance abuse and chemical dependence.; assessment, diagnosis and differential diagnosis of substance use disorders (including assessment with the AUI, ASI, MAST and others); and treatment models and modalities for addicted or substance abusing clients.

 

CSL 6380 Seminar in Marriage & Family Therapy     3 credits
This course is for students with prior coursework in marriage and family therapy. It focuses on current research and theory in the field, and provides students with the opportunity to build theory and create and develop marriage and family interventions. Prerequisites: CSL 6160 and CSL 6600. 

 

CSL 6460 Marital Systems     3 credits
This course explores current theory and practice of couple and marital therapy. It includes a review of the professional and non-professional literature related to the subject. Topics such as divorce, infidelity, relationship enhancement, cross-cultural marriages, and same sex couples are researched. Interactive patterns, societal influences, and intervention strategies are discussed. Prerequisite: CSL 6160 or equivalent. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 6460.

 

CSL 6470 Theories & Techniques of Group Counseling & Psychotherapy     3 credits
This course is a study of the history, theory, and practice of group counseling and psychotherapy. Several major contemporary models of group counseling are examined. Instructional methods include both didactic presentations and experiential methods. Students are afforded the opportunity to participate in a training group as a group member and as a leader. A strong emphasis is placed on ethical standards and self-assessment of personal strengths and weaknesses that affect group leadership. Prerequisite: CSL 6210. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 6470.

 

CSL 6501 Psychology of Personality     3 credits
This course explores the major theories of personality including Psychodynamic, Behavioral, Biological, Cognitive, Trait-Factor, and Humanistic/Existential approaches. Students study individual theories and compare and contrast these theoretical positions in terms of current research. In addition, students explore the relevance and application of personality theories to the profession of psychology. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 6501.

 

CSL 6570 Comparative Styles in Parenting     2 credits
This course reviews the various styles of parenting and guiding the development of children and adolescents. Styles are compared and contrasted, with specific targets toward assisting parents in the marriage and family counseling process.

 

CSL 6575 Couples Communication     2 credits
This course provides an examination of the types and levels of effectiveness of communication employed by couples. Areas of focus include communication media, modalities, styles, techniques, and methods of interpretation used by couples.

 

CSL 6580 Human Sexuality & Sexual Disorders     3 credits
This course focuses on the sexual response cycle, sexual identity, and the treatment of sexual disorders in clinical practice. The primary emphasis is on the way in which a disturbance in the processes of the sexual response cycle (desire/excitement/orgasm/resolution) leads to sexual dysfunction. The student also becomes familiar with the paraphilias and gender identity disorders. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 6580.

 

CSL 6585 Play Therapy     2 credits
This course is designed to acquaint students with the types of children with whom therapy is appropriate and to help students improve their ability to conduct meaningful assessment interviews with children, parents, and teachers. The course emphasizes the play therapy approach to psychotherapy with children and familiarizes the student with current law and play therapy techniques addressing physical, emotional, and sexual abuse of children, including theoretical understanding of play therapy techniques.

 

CSL 6600 Theories & Techniques of Marriage & Family Therapy I     3 credits
This course is a didactic integration designed to introduce the student to the foundations of marriage and family therapy. It provides an overview of the major theoretical approaches to marriage and family therapy. Assessment techniques and intervention strategies are presented for all of the schools of thought, with an emphasis on intergenerational, communication, experiential, structural, and behavioral approaches. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 6600.

 

CSL 6610 Theories & Techniques of Marriage & Family Therapy II     3 credits
This course focuses on mastery of basic and advanced principles of marriage and family therapy through an integration of therapeutic perspectives of modernist models. Models studied include strategic, brief solution focused, narrative, and integrative. Intervention strategies from each perspective are presented and practiced. Prerequisites: CSL 6160 and CSL 6600. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 6610.

 

CSL 6820 Treatment of Children & Adolescents     3 credits
This course examines effective treatment modalities for at risk populations of children and adolescents. Intervention strategies to support the child within the school, community, and family system are discussed and demonstrated through case studies and video vignettes. The course targets a variety of disorders, the most notable of which are ADD, ADHD, Autism, PDD, Asperger’s, Tourette’s, Reactive Attachment Disorder, Phobias, NARD, OCD, Fragile X Syndrome, and other genetic disorders. 

 

CSL 6851 Counseling Practicum     1 credit
The Counseling Practicum experience at University of the Rockies is designed to further the classroom experience that students have completed and to allow them to begin practice and application of skills. The competencies that are evaluated are designed to train graduate level mental health clinicians consistent with the standards of national accrediting bodies (e.g., CACREP). Prerequisites: CSL 5280 and CSL 5290, as well as completion of Practicum Application and permission of instructor.

 

CSL 6852 Counseling Practicum     1 credit
The Counseling Practicum experience at University of the Rockies is designed to further the classroom experience that students have completed and to allow them to begin practice and application of skills. The competencies that are evaluated are designed to train graduate level mental health clinicians consistent with the standards of national accrediting bodies (e.g., CACREP). Prerequisite: CSL 6851.

 

CSL 6853-6857 Counseling Internship     1 credit (each)
The Counseling Internship experience at University of the Rockies is designed to further the classroom and Internship experience that students have completed and to allow them to begin practice and application of skills. The competencies that are evaluated are designed to train graduate level mental health clinicians consistent with the standards of national accrediting bodies (e.g., CACREP.)

 

CSL 6951 Marriage & Family Therapy Practicum     1 credit
The Marriage & Family Therapy Practicum experience at University of the Rockies is designed to further the classroom knowledge that students have completed and to allow them to begin the practice and application of skills. The competencies that are evaluated are designed to train graduate level mental health clinicians consistent with the standards of national accrediting bodies (e.g., CACREP, AAMFT.) Prerequisites: CSL 5280 and CSL 6600, as well as completion of Practicum Application and permission of instructor.

 

CSL 6952 Marriage & Family Therapy Practicum     1 credit
The Marriage & Family Therapy Practicum experience at University of the Rockies is designed to further the classroom knowledge that students have completed and to allow them to begin the practice and application of skills. The competencies that are evaluated are designed to train graduate level mental health clinicians consistent with the standards of national accrediting bodies (e.g., CACREP, AAMFT.) Prerequisite: CSL 6951.

 

CSL 6953–6957 Marriage & Family Therapy Internship     1 credit (each)
The Marriage & Family Therapy Internship experience at University of the Rockies is designed to further the classroom knowledge that students have completed and to allow them to begin the practice and application of skills. The competencies that are evaluated are designed to train graduate level mental health clinicians consistent with the standards of national accrediting bodies (e.g., CACREP, AAMFT.)

 


EDU Education

EDU 5005 Survey of Education 3 credits

Students entering the program without a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in education, early childhood education, educational leadership, teaching, or a related field are required to successfully complete Survey of Education as part of the program. This course is designed to prepare students for the program. This course familiarizes students with terminology and concepts specific to the profession of education including curriculum design, theories of learning, learning communities, and models of instruction. This course may not be transferred in.

 

EDU 5101 Learning Theory    3 credits
This course focuses on human learning theory and systems. It explores historical and theoretical views of human learning throughout the developmental lifecycle. Students will address the factors that contribute to individual differences in learning. Students will investigate the major theories concerning the learning process and explore the implications. Students will analyze and apply research in the field through a combination of critical discussions, case studies, journaling, interviews, and written assignments. Equivalent to ORG 6508.

 

EDU 5200 Law, Ethics, & Equity in Education    3 credits
This course addresses the ethical and legal issues confronting the practicing educator. Students learn and apply principles of ethical decision making, standards for human and animal use in research, and standards of educational practice specified by state and federal laws. Special focus is placed on equity and rules governing educational institutions and systems.

 

EDU 5260 Issues & Trends in Teaching & Learning    3 credits
This course addresses the shift from the pedagogy of instructor-led, classroom-based instruction to just-in-time, project-based, collaborative learning. It addresses technology integration, the acceleration of knowledge creation, the changing definition of school, and the shift in authority from the institution to the learning community. The course addresses the issues of accountability, equity, access, privacy, fair use, and protection of children.

 

EDU 5280 Emerging Trends in Technology & Distributed Learning    3 credits
In contrast to classroom-based learning, the use of mobile, hybrid, and online platforms are emerging as important forces in teaching and training in both education and industry. Students will explore emerging technologies that support student learning, accessibility, and social learning.

 

EDU 6205 Foundations of Curriculum, Instruction, & Assessment    3 credits
Students in this course will investigate case studies of actual situations involving curriculum, instruction, and assessment in higher education institutions. They will develop a broad perspective of this discipline by critically analyzing the literature and conducting educational research. Students will utilize reflective strategies to analyze and improve professional practice, identify relevant factors in the design of a curriculum, and assess an existing curriculum for their educational setting.

 

EDU 6215 Curriculum Design & Implementation    3 credits
Students will gain the skills and knowledge needed to apply adult and other learning theories, pedagogical models, and frameworks to current issues in higher education curriculum, instruction, and assessment. This will be accomplished by designing an original sample curriculum, and an implementation and evaluation plan. Students will have the opportunity to apply theoretical learning to a real-world setting. They will utilize varied instructional design strategies and incorporate innovative technologies into their curriculum, implementation, and evaluation plan with the goal of enhancing their own students' learning. Finally, students will integrate effective leadership principles to ensure stakeholder engagement.

 

EDU 6235 Strategies for Assessment & Evaluation    3 credits
Students will examine formative and summative assessment, and direct and indirect evaluation methods to assess student learning and evaluate the effectiveness of education programs. Leading research and emergent trends for assessment, accountability, and outcomes evaluation will be examined.

 

EDU 6249 Curriculum, Instruction, & Assessment Capstone    3 credits
This Capstone is a project-based course where students will identify and analyze interconnections between curriculum, instruction, assessment, and emerging technologies. Students will integrate and broaden their understandings of historical, theoretical, and philosophical foundations of adult learning. As preparation for leadership in diverse educational settings, students will also develop models or frameworks to effect change in practice and policy. This course may not be transferred in.

 

EDU 6305 Foundations of Distance Learning    3 credits
Distance learning is on the rise and the trend is projected to continue. This course explores the key factors of access, efficiency, and economy as they have influenced the history of distance learning. Emphasis will be placed on how distance learning will continue to evolve into a dynamic force during the 21st century, not only in academia, but other realms.

 

EDU 6315 Developing & Managing the Distance Learning Infrastructure    3 credits
This course is an exploration of the relationship between training and technology. It will guide students through an exploration of three key components critical to the development of technology solutions based on the addressed needs of the institution: hardware, software, and training. The course will also explore learning support, operations scalability, and sustainability.

 

EDU 6345 Tools & Technologies in Distance Learning    3 credits
Cutting edge technologies are affording opportunities for learning innovations. This course explores technological advances that can be leveraged for educational purposes, including social media, games and simulations, digital storytelling, open source initiatives, and massive open online courses (MOOC). The ability to develop and leverage these resources for learning along with the ability to analyze the issues associated with the use of these technologies in a learning community will be stressed.

 

EDU 6359 Implementing Technology Solutions Capstone    3 credits
This capstone course addresses the analysis of educational situations for potential technology support and addresses pedagogy that supports distance learning. The course prepares candidates to match needs of instructors, diversity of students, and characteristics of the instructional content to the appropriate technology solutions, and apply their learning through an integrative project. This course may not be transferred in.

 

EDU 6499 Cultural Diversity & Individual Differences    3 credits
This course provides a systematic review of the wide range of cultures and individual differences and the ways in which cultural mores, ethnocentrism, and factors such as matters of race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, customs and cultures impact behavior of the individual themselves and of those around them. Through this course, students will better understand themselves and others, in terms of perceptions and behaviors. Cross-listed and equivalent to ORG 6499/PSY 5530.

 

EDU 7000 Learning & Cognition    3 credits
Educational practice is based on theories and philosophies of learning and cognition. These accepted theories have evolved, from idealism to realism, pragmatism to constructivism, and are incorporating new research in brain-based learning. This course will focus on theories and philosophies of learning and cognition along with ways in which these theories are studied and applied in educational practice.

 

EDU 7100 History of Education & Social Change    3 credits
This course examines the history and philosophy of education, as well as a systematic analysis of the effect of social change on education and vice versa. Adult learning and higher education settings are a focus in this course.

 

EDU 7120 Transformative Issues & Trends in Education    3 credits
This course examines current issues in education, and explores how changing social trends affect educational systems and practices bound by decades of tradition. Topics include applicable federal and state policies and regulations, national education standards, access to education, and others.

 

EDU 7200 Strategies for Teaching & Learning    3 credits    
In this course students will examine strategies and approaches used in teaching and student learning. They will investigate and research current issues, with an emphasis on theories, learning, learning communities, and educational systems.

 

EDU 7220 Educational Leadership: Challenges & Opportunities (3 credits)
This course explores current trends in higher education with an emphasis on challenges and opportunities that administrative leadership will face in the next ten years due to changing demographics, technology, structures, and resources. The 21st century education administrator faces a number of challenges including student preparedness, campus safety, reduced institutional aid, programmatic costs, environmental concerns, and a myriad of other factors that make appropriate problem assessment and decision-making a priority. This course will focus on diagnosing the root causes of common institutional problems and apply appropriate solution-based critical thinking skills.

 

EDU 7240 Diversity in Education    3 credits
Students will identify and analyze the socio-cultural, institutional, historical, legal and political resources, policies, and needs associated with serving diverse populations in an educational setting. They will be prepared to advocate for underserved communities and for constituents with diverse needs and learning processes. Students will grapple with complex situations and propose strategies for resolution.

 

EDU 8205 Advanced Theories & Designs of Learning    3 credits
Students will explore the history of and most current research on learning theories and design, and examine how they relate to curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Students will design and/or evaluate appropriate instructional strategies and systems to support student learning at the post-secondary adult education and higher education settings. The student will incorporate factors that contribute to effective learning, along with research driven strategies into curriculum models appropriate to integrate into an institution of higher learning.

 

EDU 8215 Assessment Research & Evaluation    3 credits
This course will provide an analysis of differing orientations to assessment of student learning, program and instructor evaluation, and outcomes research within educational systems. Emphasis is on assumptions and expectations of what constitutes scientific knowledge and explanations; relationship of research orientation, methods of inquiry, theory, and practice.

 

EDU 8225 Culture, Curriculum & Learning    3 credits
This course explores literature and recent debate related to culture and linguistic diversity, learning, and instruction both within the United States and globally. Emphasis will be placed on an exploration of the history of and recent debates related to social, cultural and linguistic diversity, learning, and instruction in the service of leveraging resources and systems to support student learning in diverse populations.

 

EDU 8235 Curriculum Development in an Adult Learning Environment    3 credits
This course combines research from curriculum theory, instructional design, online learning, and instructional text design in order to explore alternative possibilities for designing curriculum materials in an adult learning environment. Students will explore alternative curriculum design possibilities and select and utilize instructional strategies and interventions appropriate for adult learners. The interventions will address the needs of the learners and emphasize evaluation of the learning. The course will put the student in the role of an instructional designer using instructional design competencies to carry out an experiential project.

 

EDU 8240 Theories & Models of Instructional Systems Design    3 credits
This course will include an examination of the major instructional design models and their theoretical, empirical, historical, and philosophical foundations in technology and media. Students will evaluate current theories and models and examine the historical and philosophical foundations of these theories and will present their analyses of instructional design examples as well as prepare an outline for an instructional design project, incorporating relevant learning theory, media, and other technology applications.

 

EDU 8250 Curriculum, Assessment, Design, & Evaluation    3 credits
This course will provide students with an opportunity to study curriculum assessment, design and evaluation principles, processes, approaches and models. The focus will be on the resulting impact on curriculum, assessment, design and evaluation modifications at the classroom, school, system, state, and national levels. The influence of societal trends will be examined as will recent major higher educational reform efforts and potential future trends.

 

EDU 8260 Transforming Leaders    3 credits
This course is designed for students to develop an understanding of the roles of Transforming Curriculum, Assessment, and Instructional Leaders. The various higher education leadership roles will be examined within the context of historical, current and emerging approaches to curriculum development, teaching, as well as innovations in curriculum, assessment and teaching. Additional topics include supervision, coaching and mentoring, professional development, law, ethics, consultation and collaboration, partnerships, advocacy, problem-solving, conflict management, and decision-making.

 

EDU 8310 Research into the Effective Use of Technology in Education    3 credits
Two decades of experimenting in the use of technology in teaching, training, and learning have resulted in both unexpected successes and misspent millions. This course explores the use of technology to support student achievement. Students will critically review the history not only of the success and failure of technology integration, but also will critically evaluate the research that has been conducted on technology integration in education. Students will prepare an analysis of the research as part of a proposal to their educational institutions regarding the most effective use of technology to support student achievement.

 

EDU 8320 Change in People, Society, Bureaucracies, & Institutions    3 credits
This course explores the contradictory roles of educators and educational institutions in both preserving the past and preparing students for the future. The impacts of recent innovations and advancements in technologies have not been fully realized and will be the foundation of exploration in this course. The role of change agents, early adopters, and the diffusion process on the acceptance of innovation will be investigated.

 

EDU 8330 Bridging the Digital Divide    3 credits
Differences in access to technology are emerging among countries, institutions and individuals, and having distinctive effects on communication and opportunities. This course addresses these effects and efforts to diminish and resolve the Digital Divide, from Voice for America to One Laptop per Child to the ubiquity of the smartphone.

 

EDU 8340 Laws, Legislation, & Policy in the Use of Technology    3 credits
This course explores fair use, Children’s Internet Protection Act, Communications Decency Act, Internet Gambling Act, and other laws with implications for both individual freedom and employer’s rights in the workplace. Students will explore and evaluate current policy and procedures in relation to fair use, and review and discuss case studies, laws, legislation and policies related to the use of technology in the workplace.

 

EDU 8350 Technology Infrastructure Plans    3 credits
Technology infrastructure plans detail hardware, software, and training needs for an organization, and should include both maintenance and new investments. Students will critique five-year plans for technology use for their accuracy and creativity in aligning with an organization’s vision and mission as well as managing resources. Students will outline a technology infrastructure plan for their own organization.

 

EDU 8360 Distance Learning Concepts & Configurations    3 credits
This course examines the current issues in distance learning through an exploration of the multiple venues and modalities that currently identify the term “distance learning.” Students are expected to analyze the various methodologies associated with distance learning by providing realistic solutions to selected institutional problems.

 

EDU 8370 Involvement & Advocacy in Distance Learning    3 credits
Distance learning leaders have a responsibility for involvement in policy decisions and student advocacy at the national and international level. This course explores ways distance learning leaders can share their experiences and voice their opinions as advocates for the advancement of human knowledge and opportunity. Students will develop a plan of advocacy to advance a topic of interest on both the national and international stage that will achieve this result.

 

EDU 8770 Doctoral Capstone Seminar    4 credits
This seminar provides students the opportunity to apply what they learned in their coursework to highly realistic case studies related to their fields of specialization for the doctorate. Students will review, analyze, and evaluate case studies emphasizing the practice of the content in their curriculum. The course will involve the analysis and evaluation of one or more case studies. Students will contemplate complex questions posed by their instructor, reply to those questions, respond to other students’ analyses and evaluations, and receive faculty feedback. Each student will submit a final assignment on each case, involving his or her critical thinking on the core issues presented in the case and the presentation and defense of an approach to addressing those core issues. This course may not be transferred in. Prerequisite: completion (including approved credits transferred) of all coursework required in the student’s doctoral curriculum. This course may not be transferred in. Equivalent to HUM/ORG/PSY 8770.

 

EDU 8910 Dissertation Planning I    1 credit
In this course students begin drafting their dissertation under instructor supervision. Students working individually on their dissertation drafts focus on the description of their topic, refinement of their research questions, and outlining their review of the literature with feedback and recommendations for revisions from their instructor. Final approval of these drafts of portions of the dissertation rests with the student’s individual dissertation committees, as described in the current University of the Rockies Dissertation Handbook, as revised from time to time. Following the procedures outlined in the Handbook, students may form their committees before, during or after their enrollment and completion of Dissertation Planning I and II. Prerequisite: EDU 8770. Equivalent to ORG8910/PSY8910/HUM8910.

 

EDU 8912 Dissertation Planning II    1 credit
In this course students continue drafting their dissertation from Dissertation Planning I under instructor supervision. Students working individually on their dissertation drafts focus on further refinement of the description of their topic, the final draft wording of their research questions, and beginning to write their review of the literature and research methodology with feedback and recommendations for revisions from their instructor. Students will exchange research concepts and proposed approaches about their research methodology with other students proposing similar methods (qualitative, quantitative, mixed, action). Final approval of these drafts of portions of the dissertation rests with the student’s individual dissertation committees, as described in the current University of the Rockies Dissertation Handbook, as revised from time to time. Following the procedures outlined in the Handbook, students may form their committees before, during or after their enrollment and completion of Dissertation Planning I and II. Prerequisite: EDU 8910. Cross-listed and equivalent to ORG8912/PSY8912/HUM 8912.

 

EDU 8990 Dissertation (1 credit per term, 5 terms)     1 credit
Students writing a dissertation must complete a total of 5 credits by registering for five consecutive terms of dissertation credit, one credit per term. Dissertations are written per the policies, practices and procedures in the Dissertation Handbook. Cross-listed and equivalent to ORG8990/PSY8990/HUM 8990.

 

EDU 8991 Dissertation Extension    1 credit
When Dissertation extends beyond 5 credit hours or one year in length, students must register in Dissertation Extension consecutively until the Dissertation is complete.

 


HUM Human Services

HUM 5005 Foundations of Human Services Policy & Practice    3 credits

Students entering the program without a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in human services, human performance technology, human resource development, organizational leadership, or a related field are required to successfully complete HUM 5005 Foundations of Human Services Policy & Practice as part of the program. This course is designed to prepare students for the remainder of the program and is intended to familiarize students with terminology and concepts specific to the profession of human services including the policies, practices, and services provided by the discipline and the ways in which effective and efficient interactive and performance skills can enhance service delivery and maximize the use of valuable resources. This course may not be transferred in.

 

HUM 5010 Overview of Human Services     3 credits
This course is designed to introduce the student to the broad field of human services, the types of disciplines represented in the field, the general nature and scope of services provided by the disciplines, the similarities in services provided, and the differences among the disciplines. A major emphasis will be on the ways in which human services professionals can effectively and efficiently interact to enhance service delivery and maximize the use of valuable resources.

 

HUM 5060 Grant Writing in Human Services     3 credits
This course provides students with knowledge of various types of government and private grants, sources of information on funding agencies, grant writing principles and techniques, pre-submission consultation review processes, and the overall grant review process. Practice in researching funding sources and grant guidelines and in proposal preparation are included.

 

HUM 5100 Integrative Project for Human Services Learners     3 credits
This course provides the opportunity for students planning careers in human service agencies to apply knowledge and skills obtained throughout the program in a practical way. Students may opt for projects in new program/ service delivery design, program evaluation, quantitative or qualitative research on an issue in human service delivery, or other appropriate areas, approved by the instructor. HUM 5100 is intended to be a capstone course in the student’s program.

 

HUM 5210 Recruiting & Coaching Volunteers     3 credits
This course is designed to provide students with working knowledge of volunteer use in human service agencies. Sources and methods of volunteer recruitment, legal issues in the recruitment and use of volunteers, screening issues, methods of training, and techniques for coaching, securing and maintaining on-going commitment, and effective use of volunteers are areas of focus.

 

HUM 5220 Non-Profit Principles & Practices     3 credits
This course provides students with the common issues and principles surrounding non-profit agencies and organizations. Background and philosophy, rules and regulations, tax implications, principles of philanthropy, the role of grants and other sources of external funding are emphasized.

 

HUM 5300 Human Services Policy     3 credits
This course provides students with a broad overview of the laws and regulations that govern delivery of services in the various human services disciplines. Cross-disciplinary regulations, policy development and review in agencies, and methods to impact policy /regulation development and revision at the state and national level are areas of emphasis.

 

HUM 5400 Organizational Behavior & Leadership     3 credits
This course explores the theories of human organizations, principles of organizational behavior, and principles of leadership, focusing on functions and factors which influence the structure, design, operation, and performance of individuals in complex organizations. The emphasis is on integrating theory and concepts from the behavioral and social sciences as a basis for understanding human behavior and leadership within organizations.

 

HUM 5500 Human Services Administration     3 credits
This course draws from the concepts of organizational behavior and leadership theory and human services policy to present the students a conceptual framework for leading a human services organization. Leadership issues unique to human services settings will be discussed, with the focus on developing effective leadership styles for deployment in human services agencies. Prerequisites: HUM 5300 and HUM 5400.

 

HUM 6405 Applied Research in Human Services     3 credits
This course is designed to give the student the hands-on knowledge of the practices employed in collecting and analyzing data in human services settings. Data may be quantitative or qualitative in nature. Students will be able to analyze critically the information in order to provide the appropriate feedback to their agency or an external requesting entity. Students will be prepared to communicate the research and analysis processes to others and develop appropriate written manuscripts or reports.

 

HUM 6500 Issues in Human Diversity     3 credits
This course is a systematic study of multicultural issues emphasizing respect for diversity of people and families, particularly with regard to matters of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, and sexual orientation. Specific ethnic groups are studied in regard to family relations and mental health issues. Attention is given to ethnocentrism and racism in society. Through this course, students better understand themselves (including expectations and biases toward employees and agency clients) based on their ethnic families of origin. Positive and negative feelings about ethnicity are also explored. Equivalent to ORG 6499/PSY 5530/EDU 6499.

 

HUM 7100 History & Systems of Human Services    3 credits
This entry point course provides the historical context and development of the human services field. This course examines the historical context and the evolution of health and human services professions. Students will study the origins of the profession and evaluate ways in which philosophical and ideological perspectives have defined the fields of practice throughout its history. Students will analyze the ways service delivery and social policy has changed in response to political influence and societal needs. Students will explore the differing political, social, and economic perspectives and their influence on health and human services professions.

 

HUM 7120 Ethics, Equity, & Professional Issues in Human Services    3 credits
In this class students will take a deeper look into the impact that privilege, stereotypes, bias, and language have on individuals and organizations within the public system. Students will also examine systemic and professional ethics with attention to diverse individuals and communities. Students will critically analyze and apply advanced proven approaches to ethical professional practice and organizational operations to contemporary public environments and issues with diverse communities.

 

HUM 7140 Socio-Cultural Determinants in Society    3 credits
In this case study-based course on social determinants of human services and aspects of diversity, students will examine the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age in varying US and global social systems and demographics. Students will explore social constructs, correlates of behavior, impact of social and community structure on status, and disparities within diverse communities. Students will apply social and behavioral theories of human service resources, strategies, methods, ethics, and public policy.

 

HUM 7160 Organizational Operations & Human Services Administration    3 credits
Students will apply advanced critical thinking skills in this course designed to expose them to a broad range of essential organizational operations and extend students’ existing knowledge base on the workings of human services administration. In addition to exploration of volunteer recruitment, retention and management, marketing, cross-disciplinary regulations, development and implementation of policy, change management, fund-raising, the critical focus will apply to leadership theories and organizational behavior aimed at positions of leadership within an organization.

 

HUM 7170 Financial & Grant Management    3 credits
This financial and grant management course critically examines and identifies various accounting and financial knowledge related to the establishment and monitoring of financial strategies, policies, and tools within a government or private human services organization or service. In addition, financial management roles and responsibilities, advanced grant writing principles and techniques, and ethical financial practices and accountability will be explored and developed.

 

HUM 7175 Program Review & Evaluation    3 credits
This practical program review and evaluation course for the human services discipline will employ a hands-on approach ultimately culminating in a hypothetical program evaluation and service-level improvement by completing weekly process goals, to include analysis of a completed needs assessment survey. The course will provide students with all materials needed in order to evaluate the complex program presented and complete tasks to ultimately modify it by the end of the term.

 

HUM 7200 Governance & Finance in Non-Profit Organizations     3 credits
This advanced course explores issues and best practices in the governance of non-profit organizations with an emphasis on the relationship between mission, financial management, and governance. Topics include balancing long-term financial stability with short-term mission focus, governance and financial controls, budgeting, income forecasting, program priorities, and staff compensation.

 

HUM 7210 Leadership & Advocacy    3 credits
This course explores theories of developing and applying motivation, influence, communication and persuasion methods for leaders to empower, enable, and encourage others to become actively engaged in social, human, and service issues within political and community populations in both domestic and global environments. This course is intended to prepare students to successfully assume organizational leadership roles and will include hands-on, real world leadership and advocacy opportunities in order to gain this experience for their future.

 

HUM 7250 Emerging Trends & Innovations in Human Services & Social Sector    3 credits
This highly collaborative course on the emerging trends and innovations in human services and the social sector will require students to conduct extensive literature reviews resulting in the exploration of prospective dissertation topics to gain significant knowledge of the evolution of their chosen topic. In addition to other activities to determine the future innovations in the human services and social sectors, the students will each examine the root of their prospective dissertation topic, the literature available, and what they see in the future that is emerging from this chosen topic. Students will share their findings periodically as scheduled throughout the course for collaboration and peer review purposes.

 

HUM 7480 Evidence-based Practice in Human Services   3 credits
This course demonstrates the value of evidence-based practice as an integral part of formulating human services research and policy. Course work examines the current definition of evidence-based policy and approaches to move the field forward. The course provides an evaluation of evidence-based literature, including case study examples of the application of evidence-based practices in human services. The course also examines actions to further evidence-based policy, including preparing and communicating data more effectively, using existing analytic tools, conducting policy surveillance, and tracking outcomes with different types of evidence.

 

HUM 8060 The Non-Profit Executive as Fund Raiser     3 credits
This advanced seminar examines all recognized methods of fund raising, forecasting fund raising income, and balancing administrative and fundraising expenses in the short term with longer term programmatic and mission goals. Topics include direct mail, planned giving, special events, corporate giving, and foundation grant writing.

 

HUM 8070 Advanced Seminar: Volunteers & Non-Profit Governance     3 credits
Non-profit organizations and their governance, depend heavily on sound working relationships among staff, especially executive staff, volunteer officers, and board members. This course explores common issues and concerns related to this governance, especially succession planning, assessing the ability of potential leaders, executive development, and engaging volunteers during and between board meetings.

 

HUM 8105 Applied Human Services Policy    3 credits
This course examines cutting edge trends in the formation and execution of human services policy in public and private organizations. Selected topics include the current human services climate, forces driving policy formation and execution, and issues related to the future of human services policy. The topics selected will connect human service policy with culture, existing organizational strategies, and the process of change in future directions. Effective mechanisms to influence policy are emphasized. Major case study examples of human services policy are included in the learning process.

 

HUM 8115 Theories & Strategies of Community Development & Advocacy    3 credits
This course examines the theories and research underlying the political, economic, and social structures related to community groups and organizations within contemporary society. Students analyze methods of creating communities and social organizations that empower and support individuals to work together to initiate change, with or without the assistance of outside advocacy. Students develop skills to create and assess community action plans, incorporate persuasive language into client advocacy, and organize political action groups to seek opportunities for themselves and others. There is a focus on social and economic justice within the context of human services’ ethics that supports and sustains the well-being of individuals and communities, especially among diverse populations.

 

HUM 8125 Performance & Quality Management    3 credits
This course provides students with the opportunity to explore the theories underlying performance evaluation and approaches to evaluation in human services settings. Emphasis is placed on conceptual, methodological, organizational, political, and ethical problems in evaluating both risks and approaches involved in the delivery of human services. Students will learn to identify quality and outcome indicators. They will learn to evaluate research and analyze data associated with the evaluation of the quality of service delivery and the assessment of risk. They will learn construct techniques used to perform the evaluations, strategies for getting human services professionals to be invested in the development of the research and in the outcomes, demonstration of program effectiveness, and dissemination of results to stakeholders.

 

HUM 8135 Advanced Issues in Socio-cultural Concepts & Practices    3 credits
This course provides students with a framework to explore social problems and approaches using a global perspective. Students will evaluate the sociocultural-theoretical assumptions and methodological techniques underlying the practice of global human services. Students will examine the processes of advocacy and social change at a global level. Students will assess the ways in which community, national, and international sociocultural issues impact the human services professional.

 

HUM 8145 Child & Family Advocacy    3 credits
This course will provide students with a critical understanding of child and family welfare. Topics analyzed will include infancy, baby, child, youth, and adolescent physical, cognitive, emotional human development and behavior with related issues. Additionally, family systems, challenges, and resources available, legal issues related to familial dysfunction and abuse, domestic violence, health services, global issues (e.g., human trafficking, disease, child safety, etc.).

 

HUM 8205 Change Agents in Human Service Systems    3 credits
This course examines the complex, dynamic, and rapidly changing human service system in the United States. Action research will be examined critically and applied. Students will explore the nature of becoming a change agent in the human service systems and the influences that create change in these systems, with an emphasis on current policy issues, performance challenges, and program solutions. Students will examine the social, economic, and political forces that have shaped and continue to influence the human services along with strategies to effectively manage the changes they produce, with a goal of becoming effective change agents. Students develop skills to master inner strengths and overcome limitations associated with being effective change agents.

 

HUM 8215 Special, Vulnerable & Underserved Populations in Human Services    3 credits
This course will apply a hands-on approach to understanding the unique needs of vulnerable and underserved populations in the human services field. Students will explore all of the following and select one to complete a practical project incorporating the study of and recommendations for specific needs of: military members and their families, veterans, homeless individuals and homeless families, immigrants, the geriatric community, medically underserved, chronically and severely mentally ill, single parents, the uninsured, economically disadvantaged children and families, those with human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], racial/ethnic minorities, incarcerated individuals and their families, or any other instructor approved demographic population.

 

HUM 8225 Human Services Information Technology    3 credits
This course explores the past, present, and future of various human services information technology modalities from the basics of computer literacy, telecommunications, networking, accounting and administrative applications, to security issues and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). With evolving changes in laws and policies, such as implementation of the Affordable Care Act, this course is recommended for those students interested in staying abreast of the latest in cutting-edge technologies that coincide with this and other legislative initiatives impacting the human services field.

 

HUM 8519 Advanced Seminar: Ethical Issues in Non-Profit Management     3 credits
This advanced seminar examines enduring issues in business and professional ethics and applying proven approaches to ethical professional practice and organizational operations in contemporary non-profit organizations. Topics will include social responsibility of for-profit organizations in support of non-profit organizations, program operating budgets vs. long-term financial stability, and ethical concerns related to governance and program priorities.

 

HUM 8770 Doctoral Capstone Seminar    4 credits
This seminar provides students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in their curriculum to highly realistic case studies related to their fields of specialization for the doctorate. Through discussions among students and the instructor, students will review, analyze and evaluate case studies emphasizing the practice of the content in their curriculum. The course will involve the analysis and evaluation of one or more case studies. Students will contemplate complex ques­tions posed by their instructor, reply to those questions, respond to other students’ analyses and evaluations, and receive faculty feedback. Each student will submit a final assignment on each case, involving his or her critical thinking on the core issues presented in the case and the presentation and defense of an approach to addressing those core issues. Prerequisite: completion (including approved credits transferred) of all coursework required in the student’s doctoral curriculum. This course may not be transferred in. Equivalent to EDU/ORG/PSY 8770.

 

HUM 8910 Dissertation Planning I    1 credit
In this course students begin drafting their dissertation under instructor supervision. Students working individually on their dissertation drafts focus on the description of their topic, refinement of their research questions, and outlining their review of the literature with feedback and recommendations for revisions from their instructor. Final approval of these drafts of portions of the dissertation rests with the student’s individual dissertation committees, as described in the current University of the Rockies Dissertation Handbook, as revised from time to time. Following the procedures outlined in the Handbook, students may form their committees before, during or after their enrollment and completion of Dissertation Planning I and II. Prerequisite: HUM 8770. Cross-listed and equivalent to EDU 8910/ORG8910/PSY8910.

 

HUM 8912 Dissertation Planning II    1 credit
In this course students continue drafting their dissertation from Dissertation Planning I under instructor supervision. Students working individually on their dissertation drafts focus on further refinement of the description of their topic, the final draft wording of their research questions, and beginning to write their review of the literature and research methodology with feedback and recommendations for revisions from their instructor. Students will exchange research concepts and proposed approaches about their research methodology with other students proposing similar methods (qualitative, quantitative, mixed, action). Final approval of these drafts of portions of the dissertation rests with the student’s individual dissertation committees, as described in the current University of the Rockies Dissertation Handbook, as revised from time to time. Following the procedures outlined in the Handbook, students may form their committees before, during or after their enrollment and completion of Dissertation Planning I and II. Prerequisite: HUM 8910. Cross-listed and equivalent to EDU 8912/ORG8912/PSY8912.

 

HUM 8990 Dissertation (1 credit per term, 5 terms)     1 credit
Students writing a dissertation must complete a total of 5 credits by registering for five consecutive terms of dissertation credit, one credit per term. Dissertations are written per the policies, practices and procedures in the Dissertation Handbook. Equivalent to ORG 8990/PSY 8990/EDU 8990.

 

HUM 8991 Dissertation Extension    1 credit
When Dissertation extends beyond 5 credit hours or one year in length, students must register in Dissertation Extension consecutively until the Dissertation is complete.

 

 


ORG Organizational Leadership

ORG 5001 Survey of Psychology I     3 credits
This course is a survey course developed to assist students with degrees in areas other than psychology to become prepared for graduate study in psychology. Survey I covers an introduction to research, basic psychotherapeutic concepts, cognitive development, sexual development and issues, child issues, family therapy and other therapies, learning and memory and ethics. This course is the first of two survey courses in this preparation process. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 5001. Equivalent to ORG 5010.

 

ORG 5002 Survey of Psychology II     3 credits
This course is the second of two survey courses. This course covers a brief history of psychology, psychoanalytic theories of personality as well as other personality theories, human motives and social motives, psychological therapies and questions about psychotherapy, intelligence measurement, personality traits and their measurement, social relation in groups, stress, health and illness and mind, self and well being. Prerequisite: ORG 5001. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 5002. Equivalent to ORG 5011.

 

ORG 5010 Survey of Organizational Development & Leadership I     3 credits
This is the first of two survey courses designed to assist students with master’s degrees in areas other than I/O psychology, organizational development, leadership, or a related field to prepare for the doctorate in organizational development and leadership. Survey I covers an introduction to the following topics: Industrial/Organizational Psychology, research methods, job analysis, employee selection, assessment, training and development, and performance appraisal. This course is the first of two survey courses in this preparation process. Equivalent to ORG/PSY 5001.

 

ORG 5011 Survey of Organizational Development & Leadership II 3 credits
This is the second of two survey courses in I/O Psychology designed to provide the foundation doctoral study in organizational development and leadership. Survey II covers an introduction to the following topics: motivation, learning, job satisfaction and commitment, stress management, organizational behaviors, groups and teams, and leadership. Prerequisite: ORG 5010. Equivalent to ORG/PSY 5002.

 

ORG 5100 Assessment – Tests & Measurements     3 credits
This course involves the study of the theory and practice of psychological measurement. The focus is on the process of measuring and differentiating variables of psychological interest. Students explore basic concepts of measurement and the principles of test construction. The course familiarizes the prospective professional psychologist with the common tests used in psychological and educational practice. These include intellectual, aptitude, and achievement tests; interest inventories; personality tests; and social measures. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 5610.

 

ORG 5270 Mental Health & Psychopathology in the Workplace     3 credits
This course acquaints the student with both normal and abnormal behavior evident in the workplace. The focus of the course is creating a healthy culture in the workplace, maintaining a healthy work/life balance, and managing stress. In addition, students learn the common mental disorders and personality disorders manifested in an organizational setting and how to exercise leadership to bring about positive change. Cross-listed as and equivalent to PSY 5800.

 

ORG 5400 Statistics & Research Design     3 credits
This course emphasizes statistical concepts related to methods most appropriate to data and theories in psychology. The focus is on a quantitative approach to the concepts and methods of statistical inference. Topics include sampling, frequency distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and probability. Statistical analyses covered include correlation, regression, t-tests, nonparametric tests, and Analysis of Variance. Basic research design issues are addressed, with a focus on selecting data analysis techniques to appropriately address research questions and apply the concepts covered to various psychological problems and real life situations. Emphasis is on developing skills in interpreting statistical results presented in research articles. Cross-listed as and equivalent to PSY 5400. Prerequisite for the School of Organizational Leadership: ORG 6405. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 5400.

 

ORG 5520 Social Psychology     3 credits
This course is an overview of the theories of social psychology. It helps the student explore how other people affect the feelings, thoughts, perceptions, and behaviors of an individual. Constructs of social psychology, such as social influence, social thinking, and attitude formation are examined in reference to social/psychological research. Equivalent to PSY/CSL 5420.

 

ORG 5525 Psychology of Marketing & Purchasing Behavior     3 credits
Marketing of products and services focuses on consumer and business purchasing behavior. Marketing applies the principles of social psychology, qualitative research, and quantitative research to creating demand and supplying that demand. This course explores the social psychology of purchasing behavior and marketing efforts to influence that behavior among consumers and business decision-makers. Topics include market research, mass marketing, branding, packaging, pricing, labeling, and product fads.

 

ORG 5571 Traditional Criminological Theories     3 credits
This course introduces students to traditional theories of crime to facilitate an understanding of the causes of criminal behavior. Emphasis will be placed on the origins of traditional, interdisciplinary, and theoretical frameworks as they relate to delinquency, deviant behavior, and other types of crime. Specific types of criminal behavior will be used to explain and evaluate the various theories. Additionally, issues concerning societal problems will be discussed in relation to divergent theoretical views.

 

ORG 5574 Criminal Justice Organizations & their Functions     3 credits
In this course, the criminal justice process and its components are examined. Students will become familiar with the different organizations that the justice system comprises. The complexity of criminal justice processes functioning as a dynamic system of interrelated yet separate parts will also be studied. In addition, students will be introduced to the distinctions between the adult criminal justice and the juvenile justice system to gain an understanding of the different ways in which offenders are dealt with in each system.

 

ORG 5600 Theories of Conflict     3 credits
This course will introduce students to conflict resolution and mediation theories, approaches to resolving conflict, and tools available to mediate solutions to conflict. Topics include negotiation approaches and conflict mediation involving individuals, couples, families, teams, groups, organizations and communities.

 

ORG 5601 Diagnosing Conflict     3 credits
This course focuses on the methods available to examine the causes of conflict. Topics include theories of the dynamics that lead to conflict, power in families, teams, organizations, and communities, and outcomes of conflict. Emphasis is upon understanding the origins of conflict as a means to designing effective ways to resolve conflict through mediation rather than adversarial confrontation.

 

ORG 5605 Communication Strategies for Conflict Resolution & Mediation     3 credits
Mediation of conflict often relies on a variety of effective communication strategies and approaches students will explore in this course: dialogue, mediation, negotiation, and arbitration. The course emphasizes making wise choices of message, timing, and media for communicating to parties in conflict. Techniques include recognizing when parties are approaching states in which conflict resolution is likely to succeed based on what and how they are communicating.

 

ORG 5650 Contemporary Issues in Mental Health Care Compliance     3 credits
This course familiarizes the student with major areas of compliance in the administration of mental health agencies. Through readings and exercises students will explore HIPAA, JCAHO, other accrediting bodies, grant compliance, insurance regulations and lobbying efforts on behalf of mental health systems of care. Other topics may also be examined as new issues arise.

 

ORG 5652 Managing Human Capital in the Mental Health Care Environment     3 credits
This course addresses the complexities in the selection and professional development of high-functioning, multidisciplinary teams. Topics include the coaching/mentoring of mental health professionals. Emphasis is placed on mitigating risks associated with human capital, such as stress-related issues, professional impairment and boundary issues.

 

ORG 6120 Lifestyle & Career Development     3 credits
This assessment course focuses on the evolution of the concept of career development. Students review the major theories and their application to the collection, evaluation, and use of career information for counseling psychology as it applies to individuals and groups across the adult life span. Students also learn to use assessment instruments (MBTI, FIRO-B, Strong, etc.) and integrate the findings in vocational counseling situations as they relate to adults. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 6120/CSL 6120.

 

ORG 6200 Adult Learning & Human Development     3 credits
This course gives students an understanding of adult learning principles and best practices. It also provides an introduction to key theories of human development and learning as they apply to corporate training.

 

ORG 6210 Instructional Systems Design     3 credits
This course explains the principles, strategies, and techniques that are essential to the instructional systems design approach. Students learn to assess needs, conduct audience analyses, develop instructional materials, and evaluate courses.

 

ORG 6212 21st Century Learning Methods & Modalities     3 credits
This course introduces both current and developing learning modalities including: distance learning, online & e-learning, simulations & gaming, informal learning, and blended learning solutions. Students will evaluate the pros, cons, and challenges of each modality and compare these with traditional instructional delivery methods.

 

ORG 6215 E-Learning & Instructional Technology     3 credits
This course exposes students to a range of multi-media tools used to design interactive instruction including computer-based training (CBT) and web-based training (WBT) products. Students apply instructional design principles to the development and delivery of instruction using e-learning technologies.

 

ORG 6217 Ethical & Legal Issues in Training & Development     3 credits
Topics will include ethical and legal issues, training transfer and sustainability, engaging leaders in learning initiatives, and the effectiveness of training in contrast to other performance improvement methods.

 

ORG 6220 Training & Facilitation Skills     3 credits
This course focuses on developing the core skills needed to facilitate corporate training. Students will learn and practice a variety of techniques and roles ranging from instruction to group process facilitation in both classroom and virtual settings.

 

ORG 6300 Human Development     3 credits
This course explores the major theories of adult development related to emotions, personality, cognitive functioning, social and family influences, and physical functioning. Current theoretical approaches and research related to adult development are emphasized as well as practical applications in the therapy setting.

 

ORG 6340 Critical Issues in the Health of the Nation     3 credits
This course provides a broad perspective on the health of our nation and the world. It explores the nature of health problems; the cost to individuals, systems, and organizations as well as effective interventions and prevention strategies. Students will study research on determinants of health – social, psychological, physical, and environmental, causes of death and disability, impact of legislation, health benefit plans and designs, diverse healthcare delivery systems. Students will analyze the impact on the cost of health care, productivity, and profitability of businesses and communities. In addition, national and global health issues, cultural differences, and successful intervention strategies will be examined. These critical issues will be used to make the case for the importance and efficacy of health promotion programs designed to improve the health of individuals, communities, and organizations.

 

ORG 6343 Intervention Strategies in Wellness Programs     3 credits
This course explores the various methodologies for assessing the needs of target populations through health risk assessments, biometric health screenings, medical insurance data, culture audits, and health interest surveys whose focus is to select appropriate interventions. Interventions covered will include organizational changes, integration of wellness initiatives with various departments and functions, utilizing current research, as well as health education and behavioral strategies. Efficacy of intervention strategies will be explored in terms of their ability to improve lifestyle, mental health, and enhanced organizational performance. Additional issues to be explored include information on our aging workforce, medical consumerism, and prevention of relapses. Students learn to prioritize and tailor the various interventions for organizations and will plan for involving a population in the health promotion interventions.

 

ORG 6346 Best Practices in Health Promotion Management     3 credits
This course provides students with the critical design elements necessary to plan a wellness program that incorporates best practices. The course explores best practices in the development of an operating plan, including achieving upper management support by building a strong research-based foundation, collecting relevant data, creating wellness teams, devising a vision and mission for the program, and choosing appropriate interventions. In addition, the learners are introduced to the following principles: developing a marketing and communication plan, a program delivery system, an evaluation and reporting system, and strategies to build alliances within the organization that support program integration.

 

ORG 6350 Wellness Program Leadership     3 credits
This course is designed to integrate theory and practice necessary to manage a wellness program as part of a larger organization. Learners will gain insight into the mindset of business norms and cultures, in addition to gaining skills in leading high-functioning teams and project management. Course content emphasizes a critical thinking approach to overall organizational performance and the impact of team and group dynamics on that performance. The course further examines the interdependence of team dynamics, team leadership, and organizational cultures.

 

ORG 6354 Communication Methods & Technologies in Health Promotion     3 credits
This course covers the complex issues in communicating health information and providing health coaching to participants in the program. The curriculum explores the broad range of communication techniques from one-on-one models to tailored internet programs. The course evaluates the individual strategies vs. group support strategies and technology-based options such as social networks. Students distinguish which communication methodologies work best in particular organizations, taking into account target populations and influencing factors such as differing demographics, organizational cultures, and available technology.

 

ORG 6358 Evaluating the Impact of Health Promotion Interventions     3 credits
This course examines various means for tracking the costs of disease and injuries to businesses, assessing the severity of health issues and documenting the benefits to organizations from effective health promotion interventions. Students will research the impact of health issues on business, such as medical and prescription costs, absenteeism, disability, and productivity. This course explores various tools to measure the severity of health problems such as health risk assessments, biometric screenings, and culture audits. Students learn how the raw data from various parts of the organization can be applied to track the impact of the program on individuals, departments, and the organization’s bottom line. Topics include quantitative and qualitative outcome measures and tools to measure ROI (return on investment, other financial metrics, and key indicators).

 

ORG 6405 Applied Research Methods     3 credits
This course involves the study of research design, and the quantitative and qualitative methods that can be used in addressing research questions. Students will be introduced to social scientific inquiry and the research design process, as well as some of the most common quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. Through the process of critiquing research articles, students will learn how to determine the appropriate use of research design, recognize errors and biases in conducting research, and communicate the methods and results of particular studies. Equivalent to HUM 6405. Cross listed and equivalent to PSY 6405/RES 5240.

 

ORG 6420 Fundamentals of Risk Management & Organizational Strategy 3 credits
The history and theoretical principles of Risk Management and organizational strategy form the foundation of this specialization overview course. From that foundation, the course explores the inter-dependence of all phases of risk management and organizational strategy. Students will develop an understanding of these principles and potential application to organizational development and leadership.

 

ORG 6423 Leadership’s Impact on Organizational Risk Management     3 credits
In this course students will analyze the behaviors and strategies leaders use to manage the risk management function in organizations. Through case studies, and the examination of related theories, students will develop support for a set of best practices for organizational leaders who are responsible for managing risk in organizations.

 

ORG 6425 Fundamentals of Risk Management Tools and Terminology     3 credits
This course focuses on the study of the various instruments, assessment tools, and financial models that are used by executives and leaders in their business planning, risk management and decision making processes. This will span tools commonly used in organizational leadership assessment, risk assessment, business planning, and financial models and tools to measure ROI (return on investment), and perform cost/benefit analyses. From this foundation, the course will explore the inter-dependence of ROI, risk and cost/benefit analysis in the executive strategic planning and decision-making processes. Students will review theories and develop executive decision process models based upon quantitative risk, financial and strategy analysis tools and models.

 

ORG 6430 Managing Risk in Organizational Change Management     3 credits
This course focuses on the implementation of risk management principles and models as they relate to organizational change management concepts and processes. Risk management processes will be integrated with change management initiatives throughout the organization. Students will develop skills in integrating change management with effective risk management practices and organizational development and leadership.

 

ORG 6434 Human Resources and Risk Management     3 credits
This course examines the process of risk management as it relates to the human resources of organizations. Various operational aspects of human resource management such as selection, human motivation, labor demand and supply, basic human resource management strategies, diversity, training and development, and compensation and benefits will be analyzed as it relates to the management of risk. Ethical issues related to organizational risk will also be examined. Students will use case studies to examine and apply their knowledge on managing risk in organizations as it relates to human resource strategy.

 

ORG 6440 Risk Management in a Global Environment     3 credits
This course examines organizational risk management processes as related to a global marketplace. Students will research and examine global organizations that have successfully applied risk management principles to their global business operations. This course will evaluate effective risk management practices as related to creating global business competitive advantage.

 

ORG 6499 Cultural Diversity & Individual Differences     3 credits
This course provides a systematic review of the wide range of cultures and individual differences and the ways in which cultural mores, ethnocentrism, and factors such as matters of race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, customs and cultures impact behavior of the individual themselves and of those around them. Through this course, students better understand themselves and others, in terms of perceptions and behaviors. Equivalent to HUM 6500. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY/CSL 5530/EDU 6499.

 

ORG 6501 Foundations of Organizational Consulting     3 credits
This course focuses on the application of psychological principles to the workplace and how psychologists can facilitate the improvement of work environments, conditions, employee performance, and interpersonal/team functioning. In addition, the course provides a review of the basic theory, research, and practice in organizational training, development, and behavior. Topics covered include job performance and attitudes, work motivation, personnel selection and classification, group influence, and training and development. There is an emphasis on the contribution of specific psychological skills in organizational consultation.

 

ORG 6503 Organizational Theories & Systems     3 credits
This course explores the theories of human organizations and how they function and the factors which influence the structure, design, operation, and performance of individuals in complex organizations. The emphasis is on integrating theory and concepts from the behavioral and social sciences as a basis for understanding human behavior within organizations.

 

ORG 6504 Leadership & Management     3 credits
This course is an overview of essential principles and current issues in leadership and management theory and practice. Students explore the evolutionary progress of leadership and management theories and practices from early in the industrial age to the present. Students learn to distinguish effective management and leadership practices for different organizations and operating environments. This class will examine systematic approaches to leadership in the context of organizational culture and interpersonal factors such as leadership ethics, organizational mission, individual motivation, leadership power, organizational strategy, and team performance.

 

ORG 6505 Diagnosing Organizations     3 credits
This course explores qualitative and quantitative research methods and data analysis that leaders and consultants use in organizations with particular attention to interview and observation. An understanding of organizational structure and organizational life-cycle development is provided. The course also examines how leaders in organizations can mediate high performance and learning through project team development, communication, collaboration, and individual and group conversation-based assessment.

 

ORG 6506 Leading Organizational Change     3 credits
This course focuses on the principles and techniques associated with leading organizations through the change process. Included is a discussion of why organizations need to change in the current business and organizational environment. In addition, a process model of how best to bring about change serves as the core schema for the class sessions. To complement the “macro” or organizational approach to creating change, we also examine a “micro” viewpoint, addressing how to encourage individuals to change. Along these lines, we spend some time exploring the parallels between the organizational change process and how this discipline might inform how we change ourselves, and perhaps individuals. Finally, we draw some connections between the function of change and the role of leadership.

 

ORG 6508 Adult Learning Theory     3 credits
Human learning theory and systems are the focus of this course, with an emphasis on adult learning. The course explores historical and theoretical views of human learning throughout the lifecycle. Topics include established principles of instruction and learning methods, experiential and didactic methodologies, classroom and distributed learning, the role of technology, and learning as a strategic tool for organizations. Equivalent to EDU 5101.

 

ORG 6510 Introduction to Human Performance Technology     3 credits
This course is an exploration of the factors that impact performance of individuals in organizations with an emphasis on front-end analysis and job evaluation to determine the causes and solutions to gaps in performance. The course includes the study of performance gaps, their common classes of causes (organizational structure, skill/knowledge, environment/culture, tools and systems) and solutions appropriate to specific performance gaps. Students learn the basics of conducting job studies and performance gap analysis, as well as recommending solutions to organizational leaders in business terms.

 

ORG 6511 Introduction to Human Performance Management     3 credits
This course focuses on improving performance from the individual level, to teams, and overall organizational performance. Students explore influences upon individuals’ performance in organizations, with an emphasis on the strategic and tactical decisions required to deploy human resources effectively. This course includes systematic themes, models, and theories for making decisions related to recruitment, selection, training, development, placement, and retention. Students also learn the basics of conducting job analysis and performance evaluation, as well as how to recommend solutions to organizational leaders in business terms. Topics include legal, ethical, and diversity issues related to employee selection, performance measurement and evaluation and progressive sanctions.

 

ORG 6512 Training & Development     3 credits
This course examines the role of training and development initiatives as tools for change at the individual, team, and organizational levels. Students will also explore training and development systems designed to have an ongoing impact on organizational performance. The course explores the variety of methodologies, techniques, settings, and approaches to training and development including curriculum design and various training delivery modalities. The practical issues related to designing training and development initiatives that target specific organizational strategies will be discussed, based on established principles of adult learning. Topics include aligning training and development initiatives to business strategy, facilitating training programs, and evaluating the impact those programs have on individual, team, and organizational performance.

 

ORG 6513 Leading & Evaluating Learning Programs     3 credits
This course explores the variety of methodologies, settings, and approaches to adult learning including curriculum design. The course explores practical issues related to designing learning programs that target specific organizational strategies, based on established principles of adult learning. Topics include aligning adult learning programs and curricula to business tactics, leading adult learning programs, and the evaluation of the impact those programs have on individual learners and organizational performance. Prerequisite: ORG 6508.

 

ORG 6515 Social Capital (Networking in Organizations)     3 credits
The concept of social capital is used to describe the resources available to individuals through their membership in community networks. This course explores the history and definitions of social capital, the approaches to measuring social capital, and an in-depth analysis of how systems can be designed to prevent the erosion and encourage the development of social capital.

 

ORG 6520 Professional Ethics, Standards of Practice & Law     3 credits
This course is a study of the ethical and legal issues confronting the practicing psychologist. Topics related to clinical methodology, standards of practice, and inter-professional relations are explored. Students learn principles of ethical decision making, standards for human and animal use in research, and standards of care specified by state and federal laws. Emphasis is placed on exploration of the emotional impact that major ethical and legal dilemmas have on decision making. Students also master the current code of ethics of the American Psychological Association and other professional codes of ethics, such as the code of the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy or the code of the American Counseling Association. Cross-listed as and equivalent to PSY/CSL 5280.

 

ORG 6522 Fundamentals of Coaching     3 credits
This course will examine and analyze essential constructs and practices of effective executive coaching. It will focus on cutting edge executive coaching models, various coaching orientations, tools, and techniques of effective coaching. Students will get practice in basic skills in coaching such as establishing rapport and purpose, effective listening skills, giving effective feedback, and goal setting. The course also explores legal and ethical issues in the application and practice of executive coaching.

 

ORG 6523 Teams in Organizations     3 credits
In this course students explore the dynamics of highly functioning teams and their role in improving performance and increasing cross-functional collaboration in organizations. Students analyze the fundamental building blocks of effective teams in organizations, including behaviors of effective team members, factors that distinguish effective problem solving by teams, how organizational cultures influence team effectiveness, and the vital dimensions of team leadership. The course explores the life cycle of a team, including how leaders effectively form teams and optimize performance at different stages of the life cycle.

 

ORG 6525 International Leadership     3 credits
This course provides the foundation for students to think and act across cultures. The course examines different cultural concepts of work as evidenced in a variety of worksites throughout the world. Particular attention is given to developing and sustaining successful transcultural workforces and globally dispersed teams.

 

ORG 6530 Theories & Techniques of Counseling & Psychotherapy     3 credits
This course is an overview of the psychodynamic, cognitive/behavioral, and existential/humanistic schools of psychology, as well as corresponding models of counseling and frequently used assessment and therapeutic techniques. The primary focus in the course is on the development of both skills and rationale in the application of intervention strategies to treatment and case management. Cross-listed as and equivalent to PSY 5290.

 

ORG 6534 Human Resources Management     3 credits
This course will focus on the evolving role of human resource management (HRM), which emphasizes its strategic importance to organizational effectiveness. The course also explores the systems-oriented view of HRM integral current best practices. Students will examine the impact of trends and changes in the external environment on the design and implementation of organizational HRM strategies and practices. Topics include recruitment, selection, retention, compensation, benefits, training, development, employee engagement, and succession planning.

 

ORG 6570 Victimology: Theory, Research & Policy     3 credits
To broaden the student’s understanding of criminal events, this course explores the impact of crime on victims, both in relation to the criminal event itself as well as its aftermath, when criminal justice agencies become involved. The student is also introduced to various viewpoints on trauma effects of victimization, responses to victimization, and media intervention. In addition, the course examines the role and participation of victims in the processing of criminal cases.

 

ORG 6572 Law Enforcement & Communities     3 credits
This course introduces students to traditional policing strategies as well as to new movements and trends in policing. The role of communities in policing, the interaction of police with communities, and their collective impact on the effectiveness of policing strategies will be examined. In addition, the range of possible consequences related to various policing strategies used in communities will be covered.

 

ORG 6574 Law & Society     3 credits
In this course students explore the links between the application of law and its impact on society. Major course topics include how laws are developed, the evolution of the legal system, and the impact society has on the creation and changing of laws. The ways in which the law plays a role in creating social change will also be analyzed. Additionally, constitutional issues that guide and constrain criminal processes will be addressed.

 

ORG 6580 Correctional Philosophies & Strategies     3 credits
This course introduces students to the various theoretical, philosophical, and historical foundations for the punishment of offenders. Theoretical perspectives will be linked to strategies developed to deal with offenders. Further, the rationale behind these linkages will be explained and analyzed from a historical perspective. Students will be required to perform a critical examination to compare the relative merits and drawbacks of each philosophical approach and to assess how these approaches affect the ways in which offenders are dealt with in society.

 

ORG 6600 Principles of Human Resource Management     3 credits
This survey course explores the key role of the human resources discipline and professionals in organizations. Topics include recruitment, selection, training, development, diversity, compensation, benefits, and employment law and employee relations. The course explores human resources both from the perspective of preventing legal actions against an organization and leveraging human resources as a competitive advantage.

 

ORG 6610 Principles of Project, Program & Operations Management     3 credits
This course explores the application of best management practices in leading projects, managing programs composed of many projects, and managing operations of large organizations. Topics include project planning, staffing and budgeting, and managing people, funds, schedules, and other resources to accomplish project and program goals. The course emphasizes the psychology of selecting and teaming individuals based on diversity of backgrounds, skills, and styles as well as motivating individuals and teams to perform.

 

ORG 6650 Managing Conflict: Intra- & Interpersonal     3 credits
Students begin the course with an examination of their own beliefs and approaches to conflict, using instruments designed to assess individuals’ perspectives on conflict. The course also emphasizes how people’s feelings, thoughts, and behaviors can produce interpersonal conflict, and how individual differences and diversity of cultural and familial backgrounds impact individuals’ approaches to conflict.

 

ORG 6651 Managing Group & Organizational Conflict     3 credits
Students will develop collaborative solutions, explore models, and learn strategies to address group and organizational conflict resolution. The course also deals with the increasingly complex challenges and issues groups and organizations face, which require shared solutions, developed through broad constituency engagement. Topics include methodologies for resolving conflicts in larger organizational, institutional and community contexts.

 

ORG 6655 Intercultural, Societal & Global Conflict Resolution & Mediation     3 credits
Conflicts in cultural interaction often result from ethnocentrism. This course addresses conflict resolution in the context of ethnocentrism through the application of cultural relativity approach, evaluating conflict in various global cultures based upon the values held closely within diverse cultures. Students are challenged to think beyond cultural awareness and accepting diversity to celebrating diversity among cultures as a means to enrich best practices in mediation and conflict resolution.

 

ORG 6660 Fiscal Administration in Mental Health Care Systems     3 credits
This course explores the common metrics organizations use, the data used in support of those metrics, the assessment of fiscal outcomes, trends and events. Identifying cost centers and programs is considered. Students will evaluate differing funding streams that could potentially support the provision of services including public funding, public insurance programs (e.g. Medicaid, Medicare), government and foundation grants and private donations. Fundraising efforts as applied to an overall budget strategy will also be considered.

 

ORG 6701 Emotional Intelligence & Diversity     3 credits
Students will learn a variety of skills, both insight- and action-based, with a core focus on understanding oneself and others in order to have productive interactions. The course builds upon research in emotional intelligence, and upon the work of diversity scholars who have developed integrative competency models for emotional intelligence and diversity. The four key-competencies include affirmative introspection, self-governance, intercultural literacy, and social architecting. Students will gain an understanding of the role of emotional intelligence as an aspect of personal empowerment and professional effectiveness, learn methods to manage emotions triggered by differences, develop strategies for building harmonious and productive relationships, and gain tools and activities to help others develop emotional intelligence and diversity.

 

ORG 6705 Cross-cultural Communications     3 credits
Students will explore the dimensions of culture as well as the theories of culture and the impact that it has on intrapersonal and interpersonal communication inclusive of basic negotiation techniques. The course will explore cultures around the world from various viewpoints. Students will further develop an understanding for the depth of complexity behind ethnocentrism, and the notion of acculturation and enculturation as understood in different nations and then applied to global organizations.

 

ORG 6710 Strategic Diversity Management     3 credits
In this course, students will learn to create the infrastructure to support diversity in the organization, learn about measuring programmatic diversity outcomes, setting up diversity councils and taskforces as well as working with leadership to assure that the concept of heterogeneity is imbedded into the culture of the organization. Special emphasis will be focused on the building a business case to support diversity work in a multitude of different business environments from healthcare to higher education to technology companies.

 

ORG 6740 Sport, Fitness, & Wellness Management     3 credits
This course emphasizes the significance of administration/management theory for the sport, fitness, and wellness manager. It examines important influences in management philosophy, as well as modern management theories practiced in the sports, fitness, and wellness industry. Effective leadership and management principles are emphasized, as well as the importance of governance, human resources, problem solving, planning, organizing, leading, and evaluating within this field.

 

ORG 6742 Fundraising & Financial Concepts in Sport, Fitness, & Wellness Management     3 credits
This course stresses the use of sound methods and practices in financial management and fundraising in the field of sport, fitness, and wellness management. Topics related to financial management include basic financial concepts, systems, and strategic budgeting. Fundraising concepts include sourcing funding through traditional promotional strategies, solicitation and sales techniques, philanthropic giving, and the management of specific fundraising events. The distinct issues that make financing sport, fitness, and wellness unique in comparison to other types of business are also examined.

 

ORG 6745 Marketing in Sport, Fitness, & Wellness     3 credits
This course examines the marketing concepts as they relate to organizations that function within the sports, fitness and wellness industry as well as provides an overview of the historical perspectives of marketed sporting events. Topics covered in this course include branding, athletic endorsements, corporate sponsorships, market research and consumer behavior as well as social issues in sport-related advertising.

 

ORG 6747 Facilities Management in Sport, Fitness, & Wellness     3 credits
This course examines the fundamental theories, standards, and recommendations for developing, planning, constructing, and managing various venues in sports, fitness, and wellness. Included in the course are essential topics related to planning for events and tournaments, facility design/construction, program development, facility scheduling, staff and security planning, crowd control, fiscal control, law and risk management, facility marketing, facility maintenance, and box office/concession management. The course combines theoretical and practical opportunities to help students gain a background of its importance for success in the industry of sport, fitness, and wellness.

 

ORG 6750 Legal Concepts & Personnel Leadership in Sport, Fitness, & Wellness     3 credits
This course examines legal concepts and trends, and additional areas of human resource management (HRM) pertaining to performance evaluation and development in the field of sport, fitness and wellness management. Additionally, this course emphasizes specific legal matters, such as workplace discrimination and anti-trust issues.

 

ORG 6752 Sociological Aspects & Ethical Issues in Sport, Fitness, & Wellness     3 credits
This course addresses the relationship between sports and society, specifically how sport as an institution has and continues to influence society, how it acts as an agent of social change, and how it functions as a microcosm of society. Current ethical theories and trends are also examined.

 

ORG 6800 Foundations of Entrepreneurship     3 credits
This course presents the foundations of entrepreneurship and the development and management of entrepreneurial ventures. Includes the structure, legal/compliance issues, management processes, strategic planning and foundational skills required for entrepreneurial ventures. Contrasts entrepreneurial ventures with traditional enterprises.

 

ORG 6802 Product & Service Development & Management     3 credits
This course gives students an understanding of the principles and practices associated with the development of new products and services, and the management of these through their lifecycle.

 

ORG 6805 Financing Development, Innovation, & Growth     3 credits
This course presents approaches to financing the development and growth of innovations within corporations and in entrepreneurial ventures. Different forms of financing are discussed and compared, as well as their application to different types of ventures. The financing process and associated considerations are also discussed.

 

ORG 6807 Marketing & Managing Innovation     3 credits
This course will explain principles, strategies, and techniques for identifying market needs and feasibility. In addition, it will cover the importance of brand in innovation marketing and the fundamentals of brand marketing and management. These are contrasted with traditional marketing techniques and discussed in the context of both innovations within existing organizations and new ventures. The use and evolution of social media as a marketing tool will also be discussed.

 

ORG 6810 Measuring & Managing Innovation     3 credits
This course provides students with an understanding of the principles and practices associated with managing innovation. This includes different approaches that organizations take to managing innovation and factors that contribute to innovation. It will also discuss control techniques such as stage gate processes, funnel measurements, and other metrics for tracking innovation.

 

ORG 6812 Managing Through Growth Stages     3 credits
This course will bring together the various principles and practices and show how they are applied at various stages of growth. Conceptual models for growth stages are presented and discussed, and the evolution of principles and practices at each stage will be demonstrated.

 

ORG 6900 Technology, Communication, & Media in Organizations     3 credits
This course explores the history and scholarship of technology, communications, and media, and how these fields intersect with Organizational Development and Leadership. The broader role that technological innovation plays in the historical development of organizations and work processes will also be explored. Topics will include the role of social media in the construction of identity, the effects of telecommunications and media on organizational culture and collaboration, the role of communications and media in globalization, and the role the internet has played in the development and leadership of organizations.

 

ORG 6902 Effects of Technology Projects in Organizations     3 credits
People don’t often think about how technological responsibilities and skillsets are spread throughout the organization, and at the same time, the project affects those on the team and others throughout the organization. This course will look at the integration of change, culture, emotions, decision-making, risk, organizational structure, and project management from a technological perspective.

 

ORG 6905 Emerging Media & Social Networking in Organizations     3 credits
The main focus of this course is on the role that media forms like “social media” (or computer-mediated social networking sites like Facebook or LinkedIn) play in large companies and organizations. Topics include emerging media and internet technologies, the ethical questions surrounding social media, personal identity and the workplace, the role that the internet, blogs and email have on group decision-making and the effectiveness of leaders, the utilization of social media for promotion and public relations, and how content communities and virtual social worlds are utilized in organizations.

 

ORG 6907 Technology Innovation in Organizations     3 credits
Innovation is the buzzword, but does technology equate to being innovative? This course studies innovation theories, the subsequent disruptions, and ethics within and upon organizations and society.

 

ORG 6910 Introduction to Organizational Development Facilitation Using Technology     3 credits
Facilitating components of organizational work with technology-based tools can be a valuable skillset. This course teaches you facilitation, tools, and success factors for implementation.

 

ORG 6912 Current Trends: How Media & Communication Technologies are Transforming Leadership in Organizations     3 credits
This course will be based on the analysis of case studies and current trends in organizations. The main focus of this course will be to examine the most current research into how information, communication, and media technologies (ICMTs) can be used to increase the effectiveness of managers and leaders. Students will analyze case studies and formulate plans for how to solve problems and create solutions for organizations that use media and technology for development, communication, organization, and innovation.

 

ORG 7101 Assessment Tools for Organizational Leadership     3 credits
This course involves the study of the theory and practice of objective personality assessment and its application to executive coaching and organizational leadership. The course focuses on how objective personality assessment is used to provide insights into readiness for leadership and management roles. Primary emphasis is on those published instruments and inventories commonly used in executive coaching, organizational leadership assessment and organizational development, including instruments such as: FIRO-B, Social Style Profile, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, CPI 260, Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode, Campbell Leadership Index, Workplace Big Five, Change Style Indicator, Campbell Organizational Survey, and Conflicts Dynamics Profile. (All of the above will not necessarily be included in each session of the course; instructors will select representative examples from classes of instruments.) Cross-listed as and equivalent to PSY 7101. This course may not be transferred in.

 

ORG 7112 Leadership & Managerial Readiness Assessment     3 credits
This advanced seminar addresses the challenges inherent in creating assessment centers and processes to evaluate individuals’ readiness to organizational leadership roles and to designate others as high potential for future opportunities. The course explores best practices and methods for creating and conducting readiness assessments, reliability and validity of assessment processes, ensuring the assessment process advances diversity strategies and avoids adverse impact, and linking assessment to overall human resources strategies. Prerequisites: ORG 7400, ORG 7410.

 

ORG 7120 Principles of Program & Project Management     3 credits
The principles of managing projects and programs form the foundation of this course. From that foundation, the course explores the interdependence of all phases of project and program management from initial feasibility analysis and planning through impact evaluation after implementation between management and evaluation of programs and projects.

 

ORG 7122 Business Metrics, Financial Metrics, & Impact Leadership     3 credits
Virtually all organizations of substantial size and longevity measure their performance using metrics specific to their mission, business, industry sector, and strategic goals. Line management and executives use these metrics, and their advancement and compensation is often tied to desired changes in these metrics. This course explores the common metrics organizations use, the raw data used to track them, and the application of these metrics to evaluation and measurement, especially program and project impact evaluation. Topics include the Balanced Scorecard and similar rubrics.

 

ORG 7130 Advanced Seminar: Issues in Evaluation, Global Cultures, & Diversity     3 credits
This course explores the challenges measurement and evaluation in organizational settings across diverse ethnic cultures, national boundaries, and organizational cultures. Building upon principles of fostering and celebrating diversity in workforces, the seminar explores how the context of evaluation methods compounds the challenges in measurement and evaluation across cultures. Prerequisite: ORG 8534.

 

ORG 7210 Adult Psychopathology & Treatment I     3 credits
This course focuses on the etiology and diagnosis of adult psychopathological disorders. Students develop skills in case conceptualization and addressing adult disorders, and differential diagnosis. Benefits and limitations of the diagnostic process are reviewed. Cross-listed as and equivalent to PSY 7210.

 

ORG 7260 Adult Psychopathology & Treatment II     3 credits
This course examines the methods and techniques employed to assist adult clients in the change process with specific reference to problem diagnosis, case conceptualization, and construction of a systematic treatment plan, emerging treatment revision, assessment of outcome, termination, and ethical issues in the treatment process. While placing treatment within a theoretical context, the real emphasis in this course is on treatment techniques aimed at symptom and problem reduction. Prerequisite: ORG 7210 or equivalent. Cross-listed as and equivalent to PSY 7260.

 

ORG 7272 Group Process & Group Leadership in Organizations     3 credits
This course provides an overview of group theory, processes and dynamics in organizations. It will also examine effective behaviors and characteristics of facilitating/leading groups in an organizational setting. Students will be afforded the opportunity to participate in group simulations both as participant and facilitator. Students will receive evaluation and feedback on their group facilitation skills. A strong emphasis is placed on ethical standards and behavior in groups along with legal issues. The impact on groups of factors such as diversity, culture, distance, and others are explored. Cross-listed as and equivalent to PSY 7272. This course may not be transferred in.

 

ORG 7302 Advanced Research Methods     3 credits
This course involves the advanced study of research design, and the quantitative and qualitative methods that can be used in addressing research questions. The course is divided into three sections, which cover social scientific inquiry and research design, quantitative methodologies, and qualitative methodologies. Qualitative methods will be emphasized, but a foundation for quantitative methodological principles will be provided. Students will be required to complete a training on ethics in research, as well as complete a qualitative research proposal in an area of interest, which may include dissertation related research. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 7302/RES 7440.

 

ORG 7340 Advanced Leadership in Health Promotion Programs     3 credits
This course examines the role of a health promotion leader and the impact of culture on organizations. It provides students with the ability to be a positive catalyst within organizations to influence and lead transformational change initiatives to promote the health of the individuals and their organization/system. Students begin with an examination of tools that influence workplace cultures. An extensive and realistic case study will teach students how to track the impact on productivity as a result of creating healthy cultures, and to evaluate the role of health promotion leaders of the future. In addition to providing students with the necessary foundation to understand health promotion leadership competencies, this course also emphasizes the importance of being a strategic business partner in both organizational and system roles.

 

ORG 7343 Advanced Intervention Strategies in Wellness Programming     3 credits
This course examines the full range of intervention strategies and learning modalities for promoting health and wellness. Students will explore the most updated and proven theories for achieving strong employee participation, improving lifestyles and health outcomes, as well as for reducing health care costs. Students will analyze and plan advanced interventions for new wellness programs and mature wellness programs. Additional topics in this advanced course will cover recent issues in health care such as the impact of an aging population, use of incentives, injury prevention, and medical consumerism. Students will conduct a survey of relevant research to determine suitable environments and conditions for integration of current best practices.

 

ORG 7356 Integrative Medicine in Health Promotion Programs     3 credits
This course examines recent advances in traditional and nontraditional research that have led to new ways of thinking about well-being and illness. Drawing on fields such as neuroscience, positive psychology, and interdisciplinary consciousness studies, students will enhance their awareness of ways to promote exceptional health habits through self-awareness and enlightenment. Students will also conduct in-depth studies of advanced research and theories that integrate mind-body practices beneficial to the health of individuals, groups, and organizations alike. Advanced practices in the areas of performance, health psychology, energy healing, indigenous, and Eastern medicine will be explored. Students will assess the efficacy and appropriateness of various practices to know which of them to incorporate into health promotion programs. The Health and Wellness Psychology student will be well-informed about the ramifications of nutrient deficiency, and that there is a fourth aspect of well-being besides (a) stress management, (b) dietary choices, and (c) exercise regimen. This fourth aspect is (d) dietary supplementation with the goal of counter-balancing nutrient deficiency. The safety of dietary supplements is explored, along with the differences between synthetic, natural and organic supplements.

 

ORG 7400 Research Design & Methods Quantitative     3 credits
This course extends a student’s knowledge of the principles and procedures involved in complex behavioral sciences research. The goal is to provide the student with an educational experience that allows him or her to become an informed consumer of scholarly psychological research. The course also prepares the student to conduct advanced research. Topics include philosophy of science, advanced research methods, and analysis of variance. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 7400/RES 7400.

 

ORG 7402 Advanced Tests & Measurements     3 credits
This course involves the advanced study of the theory and practice of psychological measurement. Students review and apply the concepts of measurement (levels of measurement, variables, and validity and reliability of instruments and measurement procedures), and basic principles of statistics (descriptive statistics, univariate inferential statistics for comparisons of sample means, correlation, and regression), as a basis for exploring the proper use of tests and measurements in psychological research. Students will explore published research based on psychometric instruments and other measurement methodologies, and design a quantitative research proposal in an area of interest, which may include dissertation related research. Prerequisites for PhD: ORG 7410 and ORG 7400. Prerequisite for PsyD: ORG 7302. Cross-listed as and equivalent to PSY 7402.

 

ORG 7410 Research Design & Methods - Qualitative     3 credits
This course involves the advanced study of research design, in general, and qualitative inquiry, in particular, that can be used in addressing research questions. The epistemological assumptions underlying the qualitative methodology will be explored as students become familiar with the philosophical issues underlying how we know what we know. The ability to choose a researchable topic and create associated research questions will be emphasized. Students will become familiar with a variety of approaches including ethnography, grounded theory, phenomenology, narrative, participatory action research, and case study. A variety of common data collection methods will be studied such as observation, interviews, surveys, and historical document collection. Validation and reliability standards as well as evaluation criteria for qualitative approaches are addressed. Students will be required to complete a training on ethics in research, as well as complete a qualitative research proposal in an area of interest, which may include dissertation related research. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 7410/RES 7410. Prerequisite: ORG 7400.

 

ORG 7415 Advanced Statistics     3 credits
This course emphasizes inferential statistical concepts related to methods most appropriate to data and theories in psychology. The focus is on a quantitative approach to the concepts and methods of statistical inference. Topics include hypothesis testing, probability, multiple correlation and regression, t-tests, nonparametric tests, Analysis of Variance, Analysis of Covariance, and Multivariate Analysis of Variance. Research design issues are addressed, with a focus on selecting data analysis techniques to appropriately address research questions and apply the concepts covered to various psychological problems and real life situations. Emphasis is on developing skills in interpreting statistical results presented in research articles. Prerequisites for PhD: ORG 7410, ORG 7400, and ORG 7402. Prerequisites for PsyD: ORG 7302 and ORG 7402.Cross-listed as and equivalent to PSY 7415/RES 7415.

 

ORG 7500 Diversity in the Workplace     3 credits
This course is a systematic study of multi-cultural issues in the workplace, emphasizing respect for diversity of people and families, particularly with regard to matters of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, and sexual orientation. Specific ethnic groups are studied in regard to family relations and cultural impacts on workplace behaviors. Attention is given to ethnocentrism and racism in society and traditional culture-bound organizational human resources approaches. Through this course, students better understand themselves, including expectations and biases toward others based on their ethnic families of origin. Positive and negative feelings about ethnicity are also explored.

 

ORG 7509 History & Systems of Psychology     3 credits
This course introduces students to the theoretical systems, methods of inquiry, and terminologies associated with the history of psychology. The course is grounded in a broad historical understanding that builds a framework for understanding the contemporary field of psychology. The focus is on the major systems of Associationism, Structuralism, Functionalism, Behaviorism, Gestalt, Psychodynamic, and Existential/Humanistic. Cross-listed as and equivalent to PSY 7509. 

 

ORG 7510 Biological Bases of Behavior     3 credits
This course is designed to provide the student with a foundation of human physiology including the nervous, hormonal, reproductive, and sensory systems, and the attendant functions of digestion, sleep, learning and memory, emotion and other human biological functions. The course provides an essential knowledge base for most other offerings in the field of psychology. Cross-listed as and equivalent to PSY 7510.

 

ORG 7519 History & Systems of Industrial & Organizational Psychology     3 credits
The course will provide an overview of the key events and accomplishments that have played an important role in the historical evolution of industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology and the systems that form the basis of the discipline. A review of the history of I/O psychology introduces several important distinctions that define the discipline and theoretical models and perspectives that trace the evolution of theory and practice. The learning activities emphasize the dichotomy between the science and applications of I/O psychology. The course will trace the development of the field from three different perspectives (1) objectives for research and practice in the field, (2) basic methodological orientation of practitioners and (3) the systems and research-based foundations that form the basis of professional practice in I/O psychology.

 

ORG 7525 Issues & Methods in Market Research     3 credits
This advanced workshop explores current techniques in mass market and Internet market research, with an emphasis on state of the art methods and issues facing practitioners. The course explores the social psychology of creating and supplying demand for products and services, by applying qualitative and quantitative research methods in both traditional retail and business distribution channels as well as through the Internet. Topics include market segmentation, product feature targeting, packaging, pricing, bundling, and placement, as well as advertising through direct mail, email, Internet, electronic mass media, and print media.

 

ORG 7600 Family Systems     3 credits
This course is an introduction to the systems approach to intervention with families. It includes a historical perspective on family theory development. The focus is on obtaining knowledge and theory about the nuclear family in traditional and alternative forms. Normal family patterns of interaction, family life cycle, family of origin, family subsystems, and societal influence are explored. Contemporary issues and outcome research literature are reviewed. This course serves as a knowledge base for further study of assessment, treatment, and intervention with families. Equivalent to CSL/PSY 6160. Cross-listed as and equivalent to PSY 7600.

 

ORG 7650 Organizational Systems & Conflict Theories     3 credits
Systems theory involves an orientation to the unified whole of any system in which human beings find themselves. The emphasis will be on integrating theory and concepts from the behavioral and social sciences as a basis for understanding human behavior within organizations and resulting conflict from that behavior. Experiential exercises will augment theoretical learning.

 

ORG 7701 Theoretical Foundations for Diversity Work     3 credits
This course will review the theoretical underpinnings for diversity work in the United States. Students will consider the implications of different models and explore what diversity means as a developing field. The course explores multi-disciplinary scholars, practitioners and theorists (academic, public policy, organizational, and others) to formulate discussion, analysis and experiment in the concept of diversity as a framework for organizational success.

 

ORG 7705 Advanced Topics in Cross-Cultural Communications     3 credits
This advanced course in cross-cultural communication will focus on the natural tensions that exist when conducting business globally. Within a framework of transnational business and global economics, students will address contemporary concerns that apply to strategic alliances and the management of the globally diverse organization. Topics covered include the achievements of global leaders, characteristics of leaders, leading across cultures, leading change and relationship between leaders and followers. This course may not be transferred in.

 

ORG 7710 Cross-Functional Diversity Alignment     3 credits
Promoting an organizational environment that fosters diversity requires aligning to and with organizational values, missions and visions. This course provides an overview of the organizational system including the design, control, and improvement of business systems. Topics include operations strategy, marketing and public relations, the legal landscape, principles of measuring organizational results, quality management, affirmative action and its role with Human Resources, as well as supplier diversity management.

 

ORG 7715 Social Aspects of Diversity     3 credits
In this advanced class in diversity, students will take a deeper look into the impact that privilege, stereotypes, bias and language have on individuals, teams and organizations. Students will review the history of the civil rights in the United States and its impact on organizational structure with an emphasis on marginalization, privilege, and structural inequality from a political and organizational framework. Students will then apply this to personal and professional setting to gain skills for addressing these issues individually and systemically in organizations.

 

ORG 8001 Sport Funding & Finance for the Sport, Fitness, & Wellness Manager     3 credits
This course emphasizes the use of specific financial management and fundraising concepts for the sport, fitness, and wellness professional. Topics related to financial management include basic fundamentals of financing a sport, fitness, or wellness operation. The challenges that face the sport, fitness, and wellness professional are also examined, as these are different compared to other segments in the field of management. Modifications in the funding of sport will be emphasized, as well as an examination of the varied funding sources afforded to the sport, fitness, and wellness manager today. Lastly, an examination of recent research in these areas is offered for the student.

 

ORG 8003 Law & Personnel Management for the Sport, Fitness, & Wellness Manager     3 credits
This course examines the significance of legal concepts, fundamentals of human resource management (HRM), and the importance of each in the successful operation and advancement of the sport, fitness and wellness operation. Selected topics will have an emphasis on developing the student who will lead or manage a sport, fitness, and wellness organization. A comprehensive overview of legal and personnel concepts are examined, such as tort, contract law, constitutional law, risk management and liability issues, and ethical approaches in human resource measurement and evaluation. Lastly, an examination of recent research in these areas is offered for the student.

 

ORG 8005 Group & Team Dynamics in Sport, Fitness, & Wellness     3 credits
The proper blending of the talents and strengths of individuals can create incredible results. Also, significant negative impacts are a reality in dysfunctional groups and teams. This course defines the essential ingredients of cohesive groups and high-performing teams. Students investigate how individuals can maximize both personal and team performance. This course may not be transferred in.

 

ORG 8010 Organizational Burnout in Sport, Fitness & Wellness     3 credits
This course provides an overview of the construct of burnout, the development of employee burnout and how this affects the organizational system. Interventions for reducing employee burnout are discussed as well as strategies to prevent workplace burnout. The specific component of athlete burnout is addressed as well as the relationship between burnout and employee engagement.

 

ORG 8013 Transformational Leadership and Corporate Wellness in Sport, Fitness and Wellness     3 credits
This course emphasizes the integration of coaching and team building with the principles of transformational leadership. The distinction between executive and athletic coaching philosophies is addressed and best practices in each area are discussed. The constructs of corporate wellness and resiliency as well as relevant sociological variables and their collective impact on the organizational system are also addressed.

 

ORG 8015 Marketing & Public Relations in Sport, Fitness, & Wellness     3 credits
This course emphasizes the general difference between marketing and public relations by addressing the importance of a sport-related organization maintaining a favorable public image through consistent media outreach. This course examines the marketing concepts as they relate to organizations that function within the sports, fitness and wellness industry as well as provides an overview of the historical perspectives of marketed sporting events. Topics covered in this course include branding, athletic endorsements, corporate sponsorships, market research and consumer behavior.

 

ORG 8061 Administration of Grants & Contracts: Governmental & Community Funding     3 credits
This course provides students with knowledge of the various types of funding sources, including government agencies, private and community sources, grants and contracts as well as rules, guidelines and typical procedures applied to gaining and managing funding. The course also includes basic skill building in using social capital to develop funding sources and in grant proposal development. Interagency collaboration is emphasized.

 

ORG 8160 Mental Health Programs & Services for Special Populations     3 credits
This course covers the unique mental health service programming options for individuals representing special populations, including individuals with traumatic brain injury, mental retardation/developmental disabilities, co-occurring disorders, physical disabilities, individuals who are homeless, individuals in distressed communities, etc. The impact of family systems is also considered.

 

ORG 8165 Mental Health in the Context of Community Wellness     3 credits
This course is designed to present the student with methods of conducting needs analysis, developing presentation activities, and programs to promote positive mental health. Interaction with, and promotion within the community, is also an area of focus. Methods of conducting and presenting results of cost-benefit analysis of community mental wellness programs are also covered. Prevention and wellness programs are discussed.

 

ORG 8172 The Principles of Risk Management & Organizational Strategy Overview     3 credits
The history and theoretical principles of Risk Management and organizational strategy form the foundation of this specialization overview course. From that foundation, the course explores the inter-dependence of all phases of risk management and organizational strategy. Students will develop an understanding of these principles and potential application to organizational development and leadership.

 

ORG 8175 The Role of Leadership in Organizational Risk Management     3 credits
In this course students will examine their own personality styles and behaviors in relation to how they manage and process risk. They will analyze the behaviors and strategies leaders use to manage the risk management function in organizations. Leadership areas such as effective decision making, ethical judgment, strategic thinking, planning and organizing, communication strategies and skills, influence and consensus building as they relate to managing organizational risk, will be analyzed. Through case studies and integrated research, students will develop support for a set of best practices for organizational leaders who are responsible for managing risk in organizations.

 

ORG 8177 Risk Assessment, Financial, & Strategic Development Tools     3 credits
This course focuses on the study of the various instruments, assessment tools, and financial models that are used by executives and leaders in their business planning, risk management and decision making processes. This will span tools commonly used in organizational leadership assessment, risk assessment, business planning, and financial models and tools to measure ROI (return on investment), and perform cost/benefit analyses. From this foundation, the course will explore the inter-dependence of ROI, risk and cost/benefit analysis in the executive strategic planning and decision-making processes. Students will review theories and develop executive decision process models based upon quantitative risk, financial and strategy analysis tools and models.

 

ORG 8180 Organizational Change Management & Paradigm Shifts as Related to Managing Risk     3 credits
This course focuses on the theoretical principles and models of organizational change management as they relate to the implementation of risk management processes throughout the organization. Concepts and processes associated with the discovery and development of new paradigms will be integrated with change management and risk management activities throughout the organization. Students will develop skills in integrating change management and paradigm discoveries with effective risk management practices and organizational development and leadership. This course may not be transferred in.

 

ORG 8182 Risk Management of Human Capital     3 credits
This course examines the process of risk management as it relates to the human capital of organizations. People impact all areas within organizations; therefore the focus on Human Capital risk is a very important part of an effective organizational risk management program. Research on topics such as talent management, human motivation, basic human resource management strategies, labor demand and supply, reorganization strategies, diversity management, training and development, organizational global re-positioning, and compensation and benefits will be analyzed as it relates to the management of risk and human capital. Ethical and diversity issues related to organizational risk will also be examined. Students will use case studies to examine and apply their knowledge on managing risk in organizations as it relates to human capital.

 

ORG 8185 Risk Management & Global Organizational Business Practices     3 credits
This course involves the research and application of risk management processes to organizational operations in the global marketplace. Students will learn how to effectively use risk management tools and processes to identify, evaluate, and prioritize global strategic and operational objectives and opportunities. Students will research organizations that have successfully applied risk management principles to their global business operations and use that research to create a risk management strategy for a global organization. Risk management as a source of global business competitive advantage will be explored.

 

ORG 8201 Learning Strategies in Organizations     3 credits
This course explores aligning organizational learning and business strategies. Students will explore current issues in this area, including different approaches that organizations take to planning, implementing, managing, and evaluating training as well as factors that contribute to success. Topics include selecting the optimal combination of curricula and delivery modalities; choosing and implementing learning management systems, selecting and utilizing instructional technology tools; and evaluating the impact of learning programs on strategic organizational performance.

 

ORG 8205 Training Needs Assessment Models & Methods     3 credits
This course focuses on the process of applying research design models and methodologies to the analysis of performance problems or opportunities for organizations, teams or individual workers. Students will develop and apply a variety of systematic measurement tools, including extant (existing) data research, surveys, benchmarking, and focus groups while conducting performance and root cause analysis in the context of needs assessments or front end analysis.

 

ORG 8210 Training Evaluation Models & Methods     3 credits
This course presents approaches to utilizing quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of training programs. Models/methods will include Kirkpatrick’s levels of evaluation, Brinkerhoff’s Success Case Method, Phillip’s ROI method, and new developments in TDR (Talent Development Reporting). This course may not be transferred in.

 

ORG 8213 Strategic Talent Development     3 credits
This course focuses on the role of the training function as it relates to strategic talent development utilizing an evidence-based approach. Students will learn how to integrate and align a development strategy with the long-term goals and needs of the organization. Connections will be made to tools and methods utilized for performance management, identification of high-potential leaders, and succession planning. Topics will include the increasing demand for leadership development and executive coaching.

 

ORG 8215 Global Issues in Training & Development     3 credits
This course will focus on the issues, challenges and opportunities associated with operating a training and/or learning & development function for international and multi-national organizations. Topics such as cultural norms, learning style preferences, linguistic issues, and technological differences will be explored.

 

ORG 8270 Diversity & Inclusion - Research in Action     3 credits
In this course, students will conduct an action research project to help select the appropriate interventions related to diversity and inclusion. It is critical that when designing plans, students understand the role that different solutions have toward meeting organizational goals. Students will first begin by defining diversity and inclusion and how the definitions relate to organizational solutions. Then, they will explore approaches that organizations may take to assess and evaluate their needs, and to plan and then execute the appropriate response to support the organizational strategy. Topics will include: learning and development, training, communications, event planning, and community relations.

 

ORG 8300 International Comparison of Health Insurance Systems     3 credits
This course examines healthcare delivery systems in various developed economies around the world. Content focuses on health insurance and other forms of healthcare financing, and means of providing efficient and effective healthcare to the general public. The course includes discussions of a variety of healthcare financing and healthcare delivery systems in countries around the world, some of which offer nationally financed programs, while others offer a combination of nationalized and private health care features. Pertinent issues related to healthcare financing and delivery systems located in the United States will be highlighted and analyzed. Topics include current issues and practices in the public policy related to financing and delivery of healthcare, preventative and wellness programs, access to healthcare, and quality of care.

 

ORG 8320 Environmental Stress on Mind and Body     3 credits
This course addresses important aspects of environmental influences on health and wellness, such as exposure to industrial chemicals, environmental toxins in air, water due to excessive use of agricultural chemicals, as well as contaminates from radon, molds and cancer causing erionite exposure. A corporate health and wellness consultant needs to be familiar with basic environmental hazards that cause illness both in the private and corporate settings, as well as how to address the health and wellness needs of those whose health has already been compromised through environmental agents.

 

ORG 8340 Exploring the Self: Increasing the Efficiency of Helping Others     3 credits
This course emphasizes the importance of reflecting on the self. The emphasis is on exploring unresolved shame, guilt, anger and interpersonal communication blunders, the role of forgiveness and making amends, along with negative and positive communication patterns as they help future health and wellness experts increase their effectiveness in advising and counseling employees, patients and clients in various organizational settings. The role of suppressing biased thinking is also addressed. The idea is that people who are able to address their own psychological needs are more efficient in helping others, than those who have unresolved issues. This course is taught on-line, with a weekend residency portion (on-ground live colloquium). This course may not be transferred in.

 

ORG 8500 Advanced Topics in Organizational Consulting     3 credits
This course focuses on the application of psychological principles to the workplace and how psychologists can facilitate the improvement of work environments, conditions, employee performance, and interpersonal/team functioning. In addition, the course provides a review of the basic theory, research, and practice in organizational training, development, and behavior. Topics covered include job performance and attitudes, work motivation, personnel selection and classification, group influence, and training and development. There is an emphasis on the contribution of specific psychological skills in organizational consultation.

 

ORG 8510 Advanced Seminar: Leading Organizational Change     3 credits
This seminar examines cutting edge trends in organizational change, the current global business climate, forces driving change, and issues related to positioning organizations for the future. The topics selected will connect change with culture, existing organizational strategies, and the process of change in future directions. Major case study examples of organizational change are included in the learning process.

 

ORG 8511 Advanced Topics in Performance Management     3 credits
This course takes a broad perspective on the theory and strategic application of performance management systems design and implementation, with an emphasis on the more complex issues and questions associated with these advanced systems. This advanced course explores strategic issues and best practices in employee engagement, leadership development, succession planning, evaluative performance feedback, and compensation models. The ways that the changing nature of work and changing demographics in the business world are influencing performance management systems are examined, including globalization, generational differences, multinational operations and cross-cultural issues. Based on current theories and applications for performance management systems, students explore current literature and case examples to implement and support organizational development and increased organizational effectiveness.

 

ORG 8512 Leadership & Organizational Cultures     3 credits
This course addresses the key relationships among organizational culture, executing business strategy, structuring organizations into teams and workgroups, and aligning these with culture. The role of leaders in creating, maintaining, and changing culture gets special emphasis. The course includes current theories on the role of culture in organizational success and the role of leadership in guiding the organization and its culture toward successful outcomes.

 

ORG 8516 Ethical Leadership in Organizational Culture     3 credits
This course examines business and professional ethics with an emphasis on their impact in organizational operations. Personal leadership attributes and characteristics and the role of leadership in guiding the organization and its culture toward successful outcomes receive special emphasis. Topics include the social response of organizations, leadership skills and practice, key relationships among organizational cultures, structuring organizational teams and workgroups and the role of leaders in creating, maintaining and changing cultures.

 

ORG 8518 Professional & Business Ethics in Organizational Leadership     3 credits
This advanced seminar examines enduring issues in business and professional ethics and applying proven approaches to ethical professional practice and organizational operations to contemporary organizational environments and issues. This course must be taken at University of the Rockies and may not be transferred from another institution. This course may not be transferred in.

 

ORG 8520 Coaching for High Performance     3 credits
Students in this course are familiarized with the current literature and ethics of executive coaching. In addition, the course trains students in effective methods of organizational coaching: helping managers and other executives transform themselves in areas where they are ineffective, reshape their values, communicate more effectively in the workplace, and challenge them to achieve higher levels of performance. Because this is a two tiered process, students also learn to train leaders in organizations to coach direct reports, peers, and superiors to enhance their growth and development and thus impact the entire organization in a positive way.

 

ORG 8522 Transformational Leadership, Coaching Top Level Executives     3 credits
Many major companies have made coaching and leadership development a core part of executive development. This course takes the next step in examining the theories of leadership with emphasis on linking theory and practice to create effective organizational leaders. This course must be taken at University of the Rockies and may not be transferred from another institution. This course may not be transferred in.

  

ORG 8530 Influence, Motivation & Persuasion in the Workplace     3 credits
This advanced graduate seminar explores theories of motivating adult performance in the workplace. The exploration includes theories and application of methods for leaders to influence and persuade others in ways that motivate and engage them in their work and their organization’s mission.

 

ORG 8532 Advanced Seminar: The Leader as Coach     3 credits
This advanced graduate seminar explores models and techniques for organizational leaders to apply in coaching others in their organization, especially direct reports and others they influence in matrixed organizations.

 

ORG 8534 Advanced Seminar: Human Resources Business Strategy     3 credits
This advanced graduate seminar explores issues and models for leveraging human resources to execute business strategy. Topics include succession planning, leadership development models, workforce staffing models, compensation models, and training and development strategies.

 

ORG 8535 Organizational Consulting as a Business     3 credits
Organizational consulting is a partnership between the consultant, the organization and its leadership, in which all involved agree on the specific goals and parameters of the contract. Topics include establishing and marketing the consultant’s unique skills as well as basic business management. Also emphasized are the ethical, legal, and business obligations of the person engaged in the consulting profession.

  

ORG 8540 Advanced Instructional Systems Theory & Design     3 credits
This course combines foundational knowledge of instructional systems design with an exploration of learning technologies such as games, simulations, and electronic performance support systems. Methods for design and delivery of these technologies will also be explored.

 

ORG 8542 Advanced Seminar: Learning Strategies in Organizations     3 credits
This advanced seminar explores current topics in aligning educational and business strategy in organizations. Students will explore current issues in this area, including published literature, with an emphasis on learning the implementation of educational and learning strategy in organizations. Topics include return on investment in learning programs, selecting the optimal combination of curriculum, instruction, and technology, and evaluating the impact of learning programs on the strategic organizational performance. This course may not be transferred in.

 

ORG 8545 Advanced Seminar: Learning Initiatives & Organizational Change     3 credits
This advanced course explores the role of learning, education and training in designing and implementing organizational change. The course examines the role of learning initiatives as tools for change and as environmental factors that impel organizations toward changing their strategies and tactics. Based on current theories and applications for leading organizational change, students will explore current literature and case examples of learning initiatives and educational programs to implement and support organizational change and organizational development.

 

ORG 8550 Organizational Systems Theory     3 credits
Based on current thinking in systems theory and its application, this course applies systems thinking to organizational development. Topics include system dynamics, system archetypes, dynamic links, loops, and the application of chaos theory to improving organizational performance.

 

ORG 8560 Health & Wellness Business Consulting     3 credits
This course prepares health promotion professionals to qualify as an external consultant to plan and manage an organization’s wellness programs. This course explores the critical elements necessary for creating and managing a business in the health and prevention industry. The course examines the role of the business owner and the application of research practices in writing a business plan, marketing, sales, and proposal writing. Students learn how to apply metrics and methods to measure the various aspects of business performance as well as the outcomes of their clients’ programs.

 

ORG 8571 Contemporary Criminological Theory     3 credits
This course involves a critical analysis of contemporary criminological theories and current applications or revisions of traditional theories. Students will explore topics ranging from restorative justice and gender-driven theories to critical criminology and environmental criminology. The relative benefits and drawbacks of each topic will be examined, as well as the status of current research relating to them.

 

ORG 8573 Types & Characteristics of Crime 3 credits
The purpose of this course is to review the classification of different crime types, and to assess the distribution of each type across an array of socio-demographic variables, including class, race/ethnicity, gender, age, and locale. Students will learn about the various causes of the different types of crimes, and the specific ways the justice system should respond to different types of offenders.

 

ORG 8575 Advanced Analysis of Criminal Justice Processes  3 credits
This course examines the processing of offenders through the criminal justice system, from arrest to corrections. Issues of due process will be analyzed and critiqued, with particular emphasis placed on judicial system parameters. Recognition of the need for the three components of the justice system to process cases efficiently will lead the student to an understanding of how systems theory is integrated into an overall analysis of the justice system.

 

ORG 8577 Juvenile Justice     3 credits
This course focuses on the juvenile justice system, while highlighting differences between the juvenile and the adult criminal justice system. The course will not only cover traditional topics such as juvenile delinquency and the processing of juvenile offenders, but also current concerns about juvenile behavior, such as rates of youth violence and gang participation. The legal and philosophical bases for the separate system for juveniles will also be analyzed and debated.

 

ORG 8580 Mental Health & Crime     3 credits
The relationship between crime, mental health, and mental illness are covered in this course, with a focus on analyzing specific treatment and rehabilitation practices used with various types of offenders in diverse settings. Emphasis will be placed on changes in the mental health system that generated an increase in the presence of mentally ill offenders in the criminal justice system. Additionally, focus will be placed on issues such as the accurate assessment of mental illness, problems with certain therapy methods, and difficulties in treating dangerous offenders, drawbacks of utilizing personnel with limited training, and other impediments and limitations to effective treatment of offenders. This course must be taken at University of the Rockies and may not be transferred from another institution. This course may not be transferred in.

 

ORG 8582 Drugs, Addiction, & Crime     3 credits
This course explores the relationships among criminality, drug use, and addiction by examining the evolution of drug policies from the following perspectives: enforcement, prosecution, and sentencing of drug users and addicts. The impact of drug laws on criminal justice processing will also be examined. Students will gain an understanding of drug use and will explore theoretical orientations that help to explain why people use drugs and how such use leads to criminal behavior. Further, the ways in which drug use and drug policies have an impact on the juvenile justice and criminal justice systems will be covered. An integral part of this course will be based on current events, policies on drug treatment, and enforcement of drug laws.

 

ORG 8586 Evaluating Criminal Justice Interventions     3 credits
This course focuses on methods used to examine the effectiveness of programs developed to treat offenders, support victims, as well those concerning crime prevention schemes. Prior evaluation models will be reviewed and problems and appropriate methods in assessing effective models of intervention will be discussed. Evaluation concerns will not only include program effectiveness, but also issues of ethics and legal requirements. Students will become familiar with how to address the need to design and evaluate programs according to such concerns. They will also have an opportunity to use prediction techniques and operational research methods to measure the effectiveness and performance of criminal justice programs.

 

ORG 8600 Innovation & Business     3 credits
Innovation in business and organizations means to introduce a truly new idea, method, service, or product. This advanced course explores the psychology of human creativity, team synergy, and breakthrough thinking. Topics include the history of innovative advances in science, technology, and business, and methods such as brainstorming, analog thinking, and inventive tinkering. The course separates myth from reality about innovation, and the mental and group social processes of creativity and innovation.

 

ORG 8612 Advanced Seminar: Organizational Culture & Performance     3 credits
Students explore the relationship between organizational culture and organizational performance. In the latter half of the 20th Century business researchers began to apply the principles of cultural anthropology and social psychology to organizations, borrowing the concept of culture and expectations of behavior based on group membership. This course explores both qualitative and quantitative research findings and case studies to explore the systemic impact of organizational culture on the overall performance of the organization.

 

ORG 8615 Advanced Topics in Organizational Development & Leadership     3 credits
This highly experiential course explores current issues and practices in the application of leadership and organizational development processes and systems. Topics include succession planning, facilitation skills, leading across global cultures, strategic planning, transforming organizational cultures, implementing effective leadership development programs, and other current topics. Learning methodology include simulated organizational environments and the development of realistic strategic plans, systems, and processes that address the issues that impact the performance of organizations viewed as a whole. This course may not be transferred in.

 

ORG 8619 Current & Global Issues in Industrial & Organizational Psychology     3 credits
Due to the rapidly and continually changing nature of industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology, it is important for scholars, researchers, and practitioners to stay abreast of current and emerging issues in the field. Given that many of the changes occurring in the field of I/O are due to the globalization of the business world, particular emphasis will be focused on the role and practice of I/O in the complex environment of global organizations. In this advanced seminar, students explore current and global issues that attract the attention of researchers and practitioners in I/O psychology, as evidenced by the published literature, with an emphasis on learning the application and implementation of best practices and emerging theories in the field. Topics in the seminar will evolve along with the issues that appear most often in the I/O literature, issues that receive the most attention in the professional and business press, and current lines of research having the most impact on the field.

 

ORG 8621 Advanced Seminar: High Performance Teams     3 credits
An advanced seminar, this course requires students to identify and research cutting edge issues in the formation, leadership, development, and functioning of teams in organizations. Topics include formal and informal leadership, self-managing teams, motivating teams to respond to mission critical or emergent situations, and sustaining high-level performance. Research emphasizes both principles of group dynamics and case studies of highly performing teams.

 

ORG 8629 Legal & Ethical Issues in Conflict Management     3 credits
This course will focus on both legal and ethical issues arising in conflict situations that range from interpersonal conflict to national security crises. Topics will include business and professional ethics, current issues in the ethics of mediation and conflict resolution, and arbitration as an adversarial proceeding in contrast to mediation and conflict resolution.

 

ORG 8630 Influencing Leaders to Resolve Conflict     3 credits
This course explores the theories and methods leaders can use to influence and persuade others to employ as constructive approaches to conflict resolution. Topics include the power leaders can employ to provide impetus to conflict resolution and effective communication strategies for leaders to employ in resolving conflict.

 

ORG 8632 Evaluating Conflict Resolution Processes     3 credits
This course explores principles, challenges, and models of conflict resolution. The course emphasizes using organizational business metrics as key macro-level outcomes measures, and multiple-method, multiple source measurement approaches to predicting and explaining outcomes.

 

ORG 8635 Developing Conflict Resolution Plans & Policies     3 credits
This course will lead the student through the development of a conflict resolution plan, and will focus on how a written plan serves as a key tool in conflict resolution for mediators, managers, and negotiators alike. Further emphasis will be given to the role communication plays the resolution process by providing a concrete structure, guidelines, and standards for conflict resolution. This course must be taken at University of the Rockies and may not be transferred from another institution. This course may not be transferred in.

 

ORG 8650 Strategies & Policies to Advance Mental Health Care     3 credits
Analyze and transform mental health treatment systems, cross cultural mental health systems, advocate for legislative change, integrate research into coherent and effective argument to analyze and transform mental health treatment systems. This course must be taken at University of the Rockies and may not be transferred from another institution. This course may not be transferred in.

 

ORG 8770 Doctoral Capstone Seminar     4 credit (9 weeks)
This seminar provides students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in their curriculum to highly realistic case studies related to their fields of specialization for the doctorate. Through discussions among students and the instructor, students will review, analyze and evaluate case studies emphasizing the practice of the content in their curriculum. The course will involve the analysis and evaluation of one or more case studies. Students will contemplate complex questions posed by their instructor, reply to those questions, respond to other students’ analyses and evaluations, and receive faculty feedback. Each student will submit a final assignment on each case, involving his or her critical thinking on the core issues presented in the case and the presentation and defense of an approach to addressing those core issues. Prerequisite: completion (including approved credits transferred) of all coursework required in the student’s doctoral curriculum. Cross-listed and equivalent to PSY 8770.

 

ORG 8801 Organization Design for Innovation     3 credits
This course focuses on developing an organization design that encourages innovation and enhances the success of entrepreneurial ventures. Various organization design techniques are discussed as a foundation, followed by application to various scenarios and business issues.

 

ORG 8803 Creating a Culture of Innovation     3 credits
This course focuses on the development of an organizational culture that encourages innovation and entrepreneurship. Principles of organizational culture are discussed as a foundation, as well as factors that increase innovation and entrepreneurship. Levers for driving culture and techniques of culture change will also be demonstrated. Students will develop an idea and business plan for an innovative venture within a corporation/agency or a new entrepreneurial venture. Students will demonstrate application of the program content in the creation of a business plan. The course will culminate in the presentation of the proposal to potential “investors” or executives. This course may not be transferred in.

 

ORG 8805 Managing for Agility     3 credits
Students in this course will learn the principles of managing for creativity and agility. This will include the role of management in encouraging and inhibiting creativity, as well as specific management techniques for managing staff in creative jobs. Specific management techniques will be compared and contrasted for their potential application to innovation and entrepreneurship. This seminar-based course will focus on the ability of organizations to rapidly respond to changing market conditions and emerging opportunities. Topics such as disruptive innovation, alternative organization models, the extended enterprise, and others will be discussed, with a focus on the latest thinking in this area.

 

ORG 8810 Social Entrepreneurship     3 credits
This course will focus on the evolving practice of Social Entrepreneurship and its application. This will include a contrast with traditional entrepreneurial ventures and the potential for integration of social entrepreneurship into existing enterprises.

 

ORG 8813 Advanced Market & Competitive Intelligence     3 credits
This course will demonstrate quantitative and qualitative methods for conducting market and competitive intelligence. Specific focus will be placed on techniques most applicable to innovation and entrepreneurial ventures.

 

ORG 8815 Global Issues in Innovation & Entrepreneurship     3 credits
This course will focus on the emerging practice of innovation and entrepreneurship around the globe, with a particular focus on developing and lesser-developed countries. As countries such as India and China emerge as sources of innovation and entrepreneurship, it presents new challenges for countries that have traditionally held positions of economic leadership – how can innovators and entrepreneurs capitalize on this trend and counter these threats? Innovation and micro-enterprise in lesser-developed countries and the opportunities that it presents will also be discussed.

 

ORG 8850 Theorizing Technology, Communication, & Media in Organizations     3 credits
Students will use the history and scholarship of technology, communications, and media, to explore and develop theories for how these fields intersect with Organizational Development and Leadership. The broader role that technological innovation plays in the historical development of organizations and work processes will also be explored. Topics will include the role of social media in the construction of identity, the effects of telecommunications and media on organizational culture and collaboration, the role of communications and media in globalization, and the role the internet has played in the development and leadership of organizations. Students will develop a theoretical expertise and conduct research about the role of information and communication technologies for new forms of organizing and organizational structure. Students will also explore and develop theories for how technology and communication have historically transformed organizations.

 

ORG 8853 Organizational Implications of Implementing Technology Projects     3 credits
Implementing technologies within an organization is no trivial task, as they impact all aspects of the organization and its culture. Managing the technology itself is very complex. However, the associated organizational issues are equally complex throughout the full lifecycle of the project – from initial ideas to full sustainment. Topics include departmental and organizational-wide decision-making processes, organizational and individual authority dynamics, balancing inter-departmental needs, managing change, and the impact upon people and their work. Students will take their integrated systems knowledge and develop plans for advising or re-directing work.

 

ORG 8855 Advanced Social Networking for Organizations     3 credits
The role that media forms like “social media” (or computer-mediated social networking sites like Facebook or LinkedIn) play in large companies and organizations has become increasingly important for the analysis and leadership of organizations. In this course, students will develop a theoretical basis in, and begin to differentiate among, emerging media and internet technologies, the ethical questions surrounding social media, personal identity and the workplace, and the role that the internet, blogs and email have on group decision-making and the effectiveness of leaders. Students will take their knowledge of how social media are used for promotion and public relations, and how content communities and virtual social worlds are utilized in organizations, and apply it to creating plans for transforming organizations.

 

ORG 8857 Building Innovative Organizational Capabilities     3 credits
How can innovation be best leveraged in organizations to achieve their strategic goals? Is technology always an organizational asset? This course builds innovative toolsets, which includes evaluating the possible impacts of various innovation theories, organization structures, and ethics upon organizations and society. This course may not be transferred in.

 

ORG 8860 Leveraging Technology Toolsets as an Organizational Development Practitioner     3 credits
Technology-based tools -- such as immersive, web-based, hand held, collaborative software, and facilitator-led technologies -- can augment the capabilities and outcomes of an Organizational Development intervention. This course studies various tools an Organizational Development practitioner can use, including selection, design, and facilitation techniques.

 

ORG 8863 Advanced Topics: How Media & Communication Technologies are Transforming Leadership in Organizations     3 credits
This course will be based on the analysis of case studies and current trends in organizations. Students will develop a theoretical basis and develop plans for the development and implementation of Information, Communication, and Media Technologies (ICMT’s) in organizations. Students will also explore the critical scholarship surrounding the ethics of implementing ICMT’s in organizations, and use this to derive ethical strategies for increasing the effectiveness of leaders. The main focus will be on using case study analysis for creating solutions to current problems in the interaction of ICMT’s and leadership effectiveness.

 

ORG 8910 Dissertation Planning I     1 credit (9 weeks)
In this course students begin drafting their dissertation under instructor supervision. Students working individually on their dissertation drafts focus on the description of their topic, refinement of their research questions, and outlining their review of the literature with feedback and recommendations for revisions from their instructor. (Final approval of these drafts of portions of the dissertation rests with the student’s individual dissertation committees, as described in the current University of the Rockies Dissertation Handbook, as revised from time to time. Following the procedures outlined in the Handbook, students may form their committees before, during, or after their enrollment and completion of Dissertation Planning I and II.) Prerequisite: Doctoral Capstone Seminar. Cross-listed and equivalent to EDU/HUM/PSY 8910.

 

ORG 8912 Dissertation Planning II     1 credit (9 weeks)
In this course students continue drafting their dissertation from Dissertation Planning I under instructor supervision. Students working individually on their dissertation drafts focus on further refinement of the description of their topic, the final draft wording of their research questions, and beginning to write their review of the literature and research methodology with feedback and recommendations for revisions from their instructor. Students will exchange research concepts and proposed approaches about their research methodology with other students proposing similar methods (qualitative, quantitative, mixed, action). Final approval of these drafts of portions of the dissertation rests with the student’s individual dissertation committees, as described in the current University of the Rockies Dissertation Handbook, as revised from time to time. Following the procedures outlined in the Handbook, students may form their committees before, during or after their enrollment and completion of Dissertation Planning I and II.  Prerequisite: completion of all required coursework and ORG 8910. Cross-listed and equivalent to EDU/HUM/PSY 8912.

 

ORG 8990 Dissertation (1 credit per term, 5 terms)     1 credit
Students writing a dissertation must complete a total of 5 credits by registering for five consecutive terms of dissertation credit, one credit per term. Dissertations are written per the policies, practices and procedures in the Dissertation Handbook.

 

ORG 8991 Dissertation Extension     1 credit
When Dissertation extends beyond 5 credit hours or one year in length, students must register in Dissertation Extension consecutively until the Dissertation is complete.

 


PSY Professional Psychology

PSY 5001 Survey of Psychology I     3 credits
This course is a survey course developed to assist students with degrees in areas other than psychology to become prepared for graduate study in psychology. Survey I covers an introduction to research, basic psychotherapeutic concepts, cognitive development, sexual development and issues, child issues, family therapy and other therapies, learning and memory and ethics. This course is the first of two survey courses in this preparation process. Cross-listed and equivalent to ORG 5001. Equivalent to ORG 5010.

 

PSY 5002 Survey of Psychology II     3 credits
This course is the second of two survey courses. This course covers a brief history of psychology, psychoanalytic theories of personality as well as other personality theories, human motives and social motives, psychological therapies and questions about psychotherapy, intelligence measurement, personality traits and their measurement, social relation in groups, stress, health and illness and mind, self and well being. Prerequisite: PSY 5001. Cross-listed and equivalent to ORG 5002. Equivalent to ORG 5011.

 

PSY 5003 Introduction to Applied & Professional Psychology     3 credits
This course provides an overview of the roles, relationships, and responsibilities of individuals in the various specialties in applied and professional psychology. Attention is given to identifying those specialties for which licensure or certification is possible and/or available, those specialties that apply the principles of psychology to organizations and organizational problems, and the distinction between experimental/theoretical psychology and applied/professional psychology.

 

PSY 5130 Life Span Development     3 credits
This course surveys the major theoretical perspectives on life span development from conception through late adulthood. Developmental processes related to physical, cognitive, moral, and emotional functions are reviewed as well as societal and cultural aspects of development. Cross-listed and equivalent to CSL 5130.

   

PSY 5280 Ethics, Laws & Standards of Professional Practice     3 credits
This course is a study of the ethical and legal issues confronting those practicing in human services. Topics related to clinical methodology, standards of practice, and inter-professional relations are explored. Students learn principles of ethical decision making, standards for human and animal use in research, and standards of care specified by state and federal laws. Emphasis is placed on exploration of the emotional impact that major ethical and legal dilemmas have on decision making. Students also master the current code of ethics of the American Psychological Association and other professional codes of ethics, such as the code of the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy or the code of the American Counseling Association. Equivalent to ORG 6520. Cross-listed and equivalent to CSL 5280. This course may not be transferred in.

 

PSY 5290 Theories & Techniques of Counseling & Psychotherapy     3 credits
This course is an overview of the psychodynamic, cognitive/behavioral, and existential/humanistic schools of psychology, as well as corresponding models of counseling and frequently used assessment and therapeutic techniques. The primary focus in the course is on the development of both skills and rationale in the application of intervention strategies to treatment and case management. Equivalent to ORG 6530. Cross-listed and equivalent to CSL 5290.

 

PSY 5330 History of Psychology     3 credits
This course introduces students to the theoretical systems, methods of inquiry, and terminologies associated with the history of psychology. The course is grounded in a broad historical understanding that builds a framework for understanding the contemporary field of psychology. The focus is on the major systems of Associationism, Structuralism, Functionalism, Behaviorism, Gestalt, Psychodynamic, and Existential/Humanistic. Cross-listed and equivalent to CSL 5330.

 

PSY 5400 Statistics & Research Design     3 credits
This course emphasizes statistical concepts related to methods most appropriate to data and theories in psychology. The focus is on a quantitative approach to the concepts and methods of statistical inference. Topics include sampling, frequency distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and probability. Statistical analyses covered include correlation, regression, t-tests, nonparametric tests, and Analysis of Variance. Basic research design issues are addressed, with a focus on selecting data analysis techniques to appropriately address research questions and apply the concepts covered to various psychological problems and real life situations. Emphasis is on developing skills in interpreting statistical results presented in research articles. Cross-listed as and equivalent to CSL/ORG 5400. 

 

PSY 5410 Physiological Bases of Behavior     3 credits
This course is designed to provide the student with a foundation of human physiology including the nervous, hormonal, reproductive, and sensory systems, and the attendant functions of digestion, sleep, learning and memory, emotion and other human biological functions. The course provides an essential knowledge base for most other offerings in the field of psychology. Cross-listed and equivalent to CSL 5410.

 

PSY 5420 Principles of Social Psychology     3 credits
This course provides an introduction and overview of the principles and theories of social psychology. The course includes exploration of behavior in groups, group impacts on individual behavior and the ways in which organizational rules and norms impact behavior. Constructs of social psychology, including social influence, social thinking, and attitude formation are covered and related to sociological and psychological research. Equivalent to ORG 5520. Cross-listed and equivalent to CSL 5420.

 

PSY 5520 Cognitive & Affective Bases of Behavior     3 credits
This course studies the science of the cognitive and affective bases of behavior. The course reviews the contributions of cognitive psychology and also studies the effect of emotion and motivation on behavior. Cognitive psychology emphasizes perception, attention, memory, reasoning, language, imagery, and problem solving. Affective psychology focuses on emotional arousal, motivation, attribution, and mood. Students are thoroughly acquainted with research and research methods in this area and also focus on how this information applies in clinical practice.

 

PSY 5530 Cultural Diversity & Individual Differences     3 credits
This course provides a systematic review of the wide range of cultures and individual differences and the ways in which cultural mores, ethnocentrism, and factors such as matters of race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, customs and cultures impact behavior of the individual themselves and of those around them. Through this course, students better understand themselves and others, in terms of perceptions and behaviors. Equivalent to HUM 6500. Crosslisted and equivalent to CSL 5530/ORG/EDU 6499.

 

PSY 5610 Psychometrics: Tests & Measurements     3 credits
This course involves the study of the theory and practice of psychological measurement. The focus is on the process of measuring and differentiating variables of psychological interest. Students explore basic concepts of measurement and the principles of test construction. The course familiarizes the prospective professional psychologist with the common tests used in psychological and educational practice. These include intellectual, aptitude, and achievement tests; interest inventories; personality tests; and social measures. Cross-listed and equivalent to ORG 5100/CSL 5610.

  

PSY 5800 Mental Health & Psychopathology in the Workplace     3 credits
This course acquaints the student with both normal and abnormal behavior evident in the workplace. The focus of the course is creating a healthy culture in the workplace, maintaining a healthy work/life balance, and managing stress. In addition, students learn the common mental disorders and personality disorders manifested in an organizational setting and how to exercise leadership to bring about positive change. Cross-listed and equivalent to ORG 5270.

 

PSY 6120 Lifestyle & Career Development     3 credits
This assessment course focuses on the evolution of the concept of career development. Students review the major theories and their application to the collection, evaluation, and use of career information for counseling psychology as it applies to individuals and groups across the adult life span. Students also learn to use assessment instruments (MBTI, FIRO-B, Strong, etc.) and integrate the findings in vocational counseling situations as they relate to adults. Cross-listed and equivalent to ORG/CSL 6120.

 

PSY 6121 Theories & Techniques of Career Counseling     3 credits
This course reviews the various theories of career counseling as they relate to career development theory, and provides the student with the knowledge base and skills necessary to select and employ career counseling techniques to help clients to affect career decision-making and career choices/career change choices. Prerequisite: PSY 6120.

 

PSY 6122 Occupational/Educational Information     3 credits
In this course the student gains information on and skill in using the various print and electronic sources of occupational information. Included are sources that provide information such as education that is necessary in various job types/roles, occupational outlook and future market demand for different career areas, roles, expectations, and career ladders in various job areas, and related information. The use of technology in career counseling/career management also composes a major segment of course content.

  

PSY 6160 Family Systems & Dynamics     3 credits
This course is an introduction to the systems approach to intervention with families. It includes a historical perspective on family theory development. The focus is on obtaining knowledge and theory about the nuclear family in traditional and alternative forms. Normal family patterns of interaction, family life cycle, family of origin, family subsystems, and societal influence are explored. Contemporary issues and outcome research literature are reviewed. This course serves as a knowledge base for further study of assessment, treatment, and intervention with families. Cross-listed and equivalent to CSL 6160.

  

PSY 6230 Treatment of Family Violence     3 credits
This course explores the major personal and social theories of family violence, including elder abuse. The course focuses on severe marital conflicts, rape, and physical and emotional violence. The cycle of family violence is examined with emphasis on societal factors that contribute to this behavior. Students explore causality and treatment alternatives for victims and perpetrators as well as current research findings in the field. Prerequisite: PSY 6160. Cross-listed and equivalent to CSL 6230.

 

PSY 6290 Learning Theory & Behavioral Applications     3 credits
This course surveys traditional areas of learning theory, including classical and instrumental conditioning paradigms, motivation, reinforcement variables, stimulus discrimination, generalization and transfer, habituation, and memory. Also reviewed are models of social learning theory, modeling, and behavioral rehearsal. Behavioral approaches to therapy that focus on modifying specific, observable behaviors, using the principles of learning theory such as systematic desensitization, cognitive-behavioral approaches, and dialectical behavioral therapy. Prerequisite: PSY 5520 or equivalent.

 

PSY 6301 Cultural & Historical Approaches to Sports & Performance     3 credits
This course provides a foundation for understanding the cultural and historical perspectives on sports and performance psychology. The curriculum explores the key contributors, important research discoveries and differing roles of professionals in the field. Students investigate models of performance from ancient to contemporary traditions. Emphasis is on the successful integration of various cultural perspectives on sports and performance.

 

PSY 6310 Physiological Factors in Sports & Performance     3 credits
This course provides the foundation for understanding the physiological dimensions of sports and performance. The curriculum will focus on physiological components of behavior and their relationship to the mental and emotional aspects of performance. Attention is given to the areas of regulating arousal, stress, anxiety and fear. Students will learn to assess parameters of the stress response. The course is designed to assist the working professional in creating strategies for optimizing human performance.

 

PSY 6312 Performance Enhancement 3 credits
Psychological Skills Training (PST) is the systemic and disciplined use of psychological skills to enhance performance. Similar to physical skills, mental and psychological skills development requires precision and repetition of multiple capacities. These include focusing and concentration, arousal regulation, imagery, increasing confidence, motivation and effective goal-setting.

 

PSY 6315 Enhancing Health & Well-Being in Sports & Performance Settings     3 credits
This course explores the central importance of health and well-being in sports and performance. Excellence in performance often demands balanced mental and physical functioning and adherence to a well-designed training regimen. In attaining health and well-being, particular attention is given to psychological and behavioral components that either support or detract from performance. Supportive elements include healthy exercise, recovery, diet and relationships. Indicators of imbalance include injuries, illness, eating disorders, addictions, aggression and burnout. Further, the course examines the temptations and dangers of illicit performance enhancing drugs. Attainment of balance is seen as a core ingredient of optimal and sustainable well-being.

 

PSY 6318 Youth Development & Sports 3 credits
One purpose of sports and performance psychology is helping people improve performance through the use of mental techniques. Sports and performance psychology also looks at how involving ourselves in sports and performance activities facilitates personal growth and well-being. Students are introduced to several important topics: 1) how physical activity and psychological development are linked, 2) effective coaching practices for youth and young adults, 3) child/parent interaction, and 4) application of this knowledge with adults.

 

PSY 6320 Group & Team Dynamics 3 credits
The proper blending of the talents and strengths of individuals can create incredible results. Also significant negative impacts are a reality in dysfunctional groups and teams. This course defines the essential ingredients of cohesive groups and high-performing teams. Students investigate how individuals can maximize both personal and team performance.

 

PSY 6460 Marital Systems     3 credits
This course explores current theory and practice of couple and marital therapy. It includes a review of the professional and non-professional literature related to the subject. Topics such as divorce, infidelity, relationship enhancement, cross-cultural marriages, and same sex couples are researched. Interactive patterns, societal influences, and intervention strategies are discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 6160 or equivalent. Cross-listed and equivalent to CSL 6460.

 

PSY 6470 Theories & Techniques of Group Counseling & Psychotherapy     3 credits
This course is a study of the history, theory, and practice of group counseling and psychotherapy. Several major contemporary models of group counseling are examined. Instructional methods include both didactic presentations and experiential methods. Students are afforded the opportunity to participate in a training group as a group member and as a leader. A strong emphasis is placed on ethical standards and self-assessment of personal strengths and weaknesses that affect group leadership. Prerequisites: PSY 7210 or equivalent. Cross-listed and equivalent to CSL 6470.

 

PSY 6501 Psychology of Personality     3 credits
This course explores the major theories of personality including Psychodynamic, Behavioral, Biological, Cognitive, Trait-Factor, and Humanistic/Existential approaches. Students study individual theories and compare and contrast these theoretical positions in terms of current research. In addition, students explore the relevance and application of personality theories to the profession of psychology. Cross-listed and equivalent to CSL 6501.

 

PSY 6580 Human Sexuality & Sexual Disorders     3 credits
This course focuses on the sexual response cycle, sexual identity, and the treatment of sexual disorders in clinical practice. The primary emphasis is on the way in which a disturbance in the processes of the sexual response cycle (desire/excitement/orgasm/resolution) leads to sexual dysfunction. The student also becomes familiar with the paraphilias and gender identity disorders. Cross-listed and equivalent to CSL 6580.

 

PSY 6600 Theories & Techniques of Marriage & Family Therapy I     3 credits
This course is a didactic integration designed to introduce the student to the foundations of marriage and family therapy. It provides an overview of the major theoretical approaches to marriage and family therapy. Assessment techniques and intervention strategies are presented for all of the schools of thought, with an emphasis on intergenerational, communication, experiential, structural, and behavioral approaches. Cross-listed and equivalent to CSL 6600.

 

PSY 6610 Theories & Techniques of Marriage & Family Therapy II     3 credits
This course focuses on mastery of basic and advanced principles of marriage and family therapy through an integration of therapeutic perspectives of modernist models. Models studied include strategic, brief solution focused, narrative, and integrative. Intervention strategies from each perspective are presented and practiced. Prerequisites: PSY 6160 and PSY 6600, or equivalents. Cross-listed and equivalent to CSL 6610.

 

PSY 6991 Master’s Thesis Extension 1 credit
When Master’s Thesis extends beyond 3 credit hours, students must register in Master’s Thesis Extension until complete. Prerequisite: PSY 6990.

 

PSY 7101 Assessment Tools for Organizational Leadership     3 credits
This course involves the study of the theory and practice of objective personality assessment and its application to executive coaching and organizational leadership. The course focuses on how objective personality assessment is used to provide insights into readiness for leadership and management roles. Primary emphasis is on those published instruments and inventories commonly used in executive coaching, organizational leadership assessment and organizational development, including instruments such as: FIRO-B, Social Style Profile, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, CPI 260, Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode, Campbell Leadership Index, Workplace Big Five, Change Style Indicator, Campbell Organizational Survey, and Conflicts Dynamics Profile. (All of the above will not necessarily be included in each session of the course; instructors will select representative examples from classes of instruments.) Cross-listed as and equivalent to ORG 7101. This course may not be transferred in.

 

PSY 7210 Psychopathology I: Adults     3 credits
This course focuses on the etiology and diagnosis of adult psychopathological disorders. Students develop skills in case conceptualization and addressing adult disorders, differential diagnosis and construction of a systematic treatment plan, emerging treatment revision, assessment of outcome, termination, and ethical issues in the treatment process. While placing treatment within a theoretical context, the real emphasis in this course is on treatment techniques aimed at symptom and problem reduction. Benefits and limitations of the diagnostic process are reviewed. This course may not be transferred in.

 

PSY 7220 Clinical Personality Assessment: Objective Techniques     3 credits
This course involves the study of the theory and practice of objective personality assessment. The course focuses on how objective personality assessment is used to provide information in educational, psychiatric, industrial, and medical practice. Primary emphasis is on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory - 2nd Edition, and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory - 3rd Edition. Secondary emphasis is on the Personality Assessment Inventory and tests of normal personality functioning. In addition, the student gains familiarity with numerous scales and inventories used to measure functioning in educational, industrial, and psychiatric practice. Prerequisite (for clinical programs only): PSY 5610 or equivalent. 

 

PSY 7260 Adult Psychopathology & Treatment II 3 credits
This course examines the methods and techniques employed to assist adult clients in the change process with specific reference to problem diagnosis, case conceptualization, and construction of a systematic treatment plan, emerging treatment revision, assessment of outcome, termination, and ethical issues in the treatment process. While placing treatment within a theoretical context, the real emphasis in this course is on treatment techniques aimed at symptom and problem reduction. Prerequisite: PSY 7210 or equivalent. Cross-listed as and equivalent to ORG 7260.

 

PSY 7272 Group Process & Group Leadership in Organizations     3 credits
This course provides an overview of group theory, processes and dynamics in organizations. It will also examine effective behaviors and characteristics of facilitating/leading groups in an organizational setting. Students will be afforded the opportunity to participate in group simulations both as participant and facilitator. Students will receive evaluation and feedback on their group facilitation skills. A strong emphasis is placed on ethical standards and behavior in groups along with legal issues. The impact on groups of factors such as diversity, culture, distance, and others are explored. Cross-listed as and equivalent to ORG 7272. This course may not be transferred in.

 

PSY 7301 Advanced Performance Enhancement I: Core Mind-Body Practices     3 credits
This course presents mind-body practices that provide the core elements of behaviors for individual and team performance. The student will learn to practice and to teach mastery of cognitive and physical skills to control systemic arousal and focusing behavior. The course will provide tools to construct performance profiles on individuals taking into account age, gender and cultural parameters. This depth of analysis provides the foundation to effectively integrate mind-body practices with performance enhancement. The student will be given strategies for measuring the efficacy of applying mind-body practices in diverse settings.

 

PSY 7302 Advanced Research Methods     3 credits
This course involves the advanced study of research design, and the quantitative and qualitative methods that can be used in addressing research questions. The course is divided into three sections, which cover social scientific inquiry and research design, quantitative methodologies, and qualitative methodologies. Qualitative methods will be emphasized, but a foundation for quantitative methodological principles will be provided. Students will be required to complete a training on ethics in research, as well as complete a qualitative research proposal in an area of interest, which may include dissertation related research. Cross-listed as and equivalent to ORG 7302/RES 7440.

 

PSY 7305 Advanced Psychomotor Development & Kinesiology     3 credits
This course explores the practical applications of physiological and psychomotor dimensions of performance. The curriculum provides a comprehensive analysis of human movement and mental training applications. Parameters for measuring the stress response will be explored in conjunction with optimizing human performance. The lifelong developmental aspects of physiological and motor behavior will be examined.

 

PSY 7311 Advanced Performance Enhancement II: Integrative Mind-Body Practices     3 credits
This course provides in depth study of advanced research and theories that integrate mind-body practices in enhancing performance. Students are taught how to utilize multiple conceptual frameworks and research findings in training skills such as advanced arousal control, imagery and focusing. The student will be able to assess the influence of age, gender and cultural factors on performance and apply this understanding to developing individualized training protocols. The graduate will be able to assess the efficacy of integrative mind-body practice models in enhancing individual, group and team performance.

 

PSY 7314 Rehabilitation in Sports & Performance     3 credits
This course examines crucial rehabilitation topics in sports and performance. The curriculum provides methods of psychological evaluation and treatment for injuries, addictions, eating disorders, and burnout. Students will investigate the dynamics of aggression in sports and performance settings. Retirement issues and exercise adherence strategies are explored. Inclusive in the course is a special debate section challenging students to confront current ethical issues in the field.

 

PSY 7317 Advanced Group Dynamics in Sports & Performance Settings     3 credits
This course examines the integral relationship between leadership, communication, and group performance. The curriculum applies group and team principles to diverse populations such as youth, special needs, high-profile performers and support networks. Leadership is studied within the context of group functioning. Students will develop research protocols for assessing group and team functioning.

 

PSY 7321 Advanced Performance Enhancement III: The Psychology of Peak Experience     3 credits
This course is the pinnacle of performance enhancement teachings. The emphasis in this course is the development of advanced awareness skills in the attainment of self-mastery. The student learns how to guide individual goal achievement in congruence with current skills. The ultimate goal for the student is to recognize and cultivate individual and group experiences that are characterized by such terms as optimal performance, actualization, effortless awareness, flow, and peak experience.

 

PSY 7330 Sport & Performance Psychology as a Business     3 credits
This course assists students in developing personal business plans. The curriculum addresses the financial, legal and ethical issues encountered in sport and performance psychology. The course gives the student persuasive arguments to use with clients to prevent their use of licit and illicit drugs and performance enhancing substances, as well as advising clients who have already used illicit substances and how to handle accusations against them for substance use or abuse. Potential career opportunities are identified and compared. The student will prepare a personal resume, market analysis and comprehensive business plan. This course must be taken at University of the Rockies and may not be transferred from another institution. This course may not be transferred in.

 

PSY 7340 Assessment of Intelligence     3 credits
This course involves the study of the theory and practice of intellectual assessment. The course focuses on how intellectual assessment is used to provide information in educational, psychiatric, industrial, and neurological practice. Primary emphasis is on the Wechsler intelligence assessment instruments. Secondary emphasis is on the Stanford-Binet and Kaufmann Assessment Battery for Children. The student also gains familiarity with numerous intelligence tests and achievement tests used in school and industrial settings and with tests used with non-traditional clients. Prerequisite: PSY 5610 or equivalent.

 

PSY 7360 Psychopathology II: Children & Adolescents     3 credits
This course focuses on the etiology and diagnosis of child and adolescent psychopathological disorders. Students develop skills in addressing disorders of childhood and adolescence, as well as psychotherapeutic techniques to be employed with children and adolescents with a broad range of psychological problems from stress reactions to psychosis. Treatment modalities include group, family, and individual. The course includes an examination of psychopathology in childhood and adolescence with emphasis on diagnostic classification systems for children, major types of disturbances, assessment techniques, and etiology as related to constitutional, environmental, and familial factors. Benefits and limitations of the diagnostic process are reviewed. This course must be taken at University of the Rockies and may not be transferred from another institution.

 

PSY 7402 Advanced Tests & Measurements     3 credits
This course involves the advanced study of the theory and practice of psychological measurement. Students review and apply the concepts of measurement (levels of measurement, variables, and validity and reliability of instruments and measurement procedures), and basic principles of statistics (descriptive statistics, univariate inferential statistics for comparisons of sample means, correlation, and regression), as a basis for exploring the proper use of tests and measurements in psychological research. Students will explore published research based on psychometric instruments and other measurement methodologies, and design a quantitative research proposal in an area of interest, which may include dissertation related research. Prerequisite: ORG 7302. Cross-listed as and equivalent to ORG 7402.

 

PSY 7415 Advanced Statistics     3 credits
This course emphasizes inferential statistical concepts related to methods most appropriate to data and theories in psychology. The focus is on a quantitative approach to the concepts and methods of statistical inference. Topics include hypothesis testing, probability, multiple correlation and regression, t-tests, nonparametric tests, Analysis of Variance, Analysis of Covariance, and Multivariate Analysis of Variance. Research design issues are addressed, with a focus on selecting data analysis techniques to appropriately address research questions and apply the concepts covered to various psychological problems and real life situations. Emphasis is on developing skills in interpreting statistical results presented in research articles. Prerequisites: ORG 7302 and ORG 7402. Cross-listed and equivalent to ORG/RES 7415.

 

PSY 7480 Neuropsychology     3 credits
This course is designed to familiarize the student with language and terms used in neuroanatomy and physiological psychology. The course explores brain-behavior relationships that exist and are diagnostic in the practice of psychology. There is emphasis on the anatomy of the brain and the nervous system. The course also looks at several neurological conditions, including AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, and Multiple Sclerosis as well as the psychological and neurological impacts of these diseases. Prerequisite: PSY 5410 or equivalent. 

 

PSY 7490 Integrative Report Writing     2 credits
This course demonstrates essential components that make up report writing commonly used in the field of mental health, including forensic/criminal/custody, school, traditional psychological, neuropsychological, industrial/organization, and other areas. Common structure of various types of reports will be considered, but with attention also given to more focused mental health venues. Common elements in report writing, integrating report writing, treatment plans and progress notes and summaries, evaluation of treatment outcomes, and documentation will be covered. Practice in writing reports will be a vital part of the course as well as review examples of well-constructed reports. Finally, ethical issues of report writing will also be examined. Prerequisites: PSY 7220 and PSY 7340.

  

PSY 7509 History & Systems of Psychology     3 credits
This course introduces students to the theoretical systems, methods of inquiry, and terminologies associated with the history of psychology. The course is grounded in a broad historical understanding that builds a framework for understanding the contemporary field of psychology. The focus is on the major systems of Associationism, Structuralism, Functionalism, Behaviorism, Gestalt, Psychodynamic, and Existential/Humanistic. Equivalent to ORG 7519. Cross-listed as and equivalent to ORG 7509.

 

PSY 7510 Biological Bases of Behavior     3 credits
This course is designed to provide the student with a foundation of human physiology including the nervous, hormonal, reproductive, and sensory systems, and the attendant functions of digestion, sleep, learning and memory, emotion and other human biological functions. The course provides an essential knowledge base for most other offerings in the field of psychology. Cross-listed as and equivalent to ORG 7510.

 

PSY 7540 Clinical Personality Assessment: Projective Techniques     3 credits
This course involves the study of the theory and practice of projective personality assessment and the way in which projective assessment is used to provide information in clinical practice. Primary emphasis is on the Comprehensive System for scoring and interpreting the Rorschach Ink Blot Test. In addition, the student gains familiarity with the Holtzman Inkblot Technique, the Thematic Apperception Test, and projective drawings. Prerequisites: PSY 5610 or equivalents. 

 

PSY 7600 Family Systems     3 credits
This course is an introduction to the systems approach to intervention with families. It includes a historical perspective on family theory development. The focus is on obtaining knowledge and theory about the nuclear family in traditional and alternative forms. Normal family patterns of interaction, family life cycle, family of origin, family subsystems, and societal influence are explored. Contemporary issues and outcome research literature are reviewed. This course serves as a knowledge base for further study of assessment, treatment, and intervention with families. Cross-listed as and equivalent to ORG 7600.

 

PSY 7620 Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology     3 credits
This course is focused on the skills necessary to successfully complete a doctoral program in Clinical Psychology and work as a licensed psychologist in Colorado. This includes completing a dissertation, obtaining an internship, completing post-doctoral hours, securing state licensure and gaining professional employment. The student is prepared to become a positive representative of, and contributor to, the mental health professional community. Prerequisite: PSY 5003 and PSY 7640. 

 

PSY 7640 Quantitative Research Design & Methods     3 credits
This course extends a student’s knowledge of the principles and procedures involved in complex behavioral sciences research. The goal is to provide the student with an educational experience that allows him or her to become an informed consumer of scholarly psychological research. The course also prepares the student to conduct advanced research. Topics include philosophy of science, advanced research methods, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: PSY 5400 or equivalent.

 

PSY 7720 Evidence-Based Practices in Psychotherapy     1 credit
The recent trend toward empirically -based treatments excludes other, more potent factors responsible for psychotherapy outcome. This course takes a critical look at “business as usual” in mental health, exposes its mythmakers, and translates the latest research findings on what really works in therapy into empirically supported principles for clinical practice. It emphasizes practical skill building over theory by teaching students how to use valid and reliable feedback from clients to deliver effective, efficient, and accountable care. 

 

PSY 7740 Qualitative Research Design & Methods     3 credits
Readings and exercises in this course emphasize design, analysis, and research concepts most appropriate to investigating intangibles and common data in psychological modeling. Techniques of methodological design related to observational, evaluative, systemic, psycho-historical, phenomenological, heuristic, mythic, and case methods are emphasized. Other course topics include data collection, reliability, validity, data summary and analysis, data reporting, influences on response rate, techniques of survey sampling (mail, questionnaire, and telephone surveys), and semi-structured interview schedules. Research issues of protection of human subjects, privacy, and confidentiality are also addressed. Students are supervised and share experiences gained while preparing to develop, administer, and analyze qualitative research projects. Emphasis is placed on the role that qualitative methodologies play in the world of research. Prerequisite: CSL/PSY 5400 or equivalent.

 

PSY 7870 Substance Abuse & Dependence     3 credits
This course addresses the basic models and theories of substance abuse/chemical dependency; basic psychopathology and psychodynamics of substance abuse/chemical dependency; assessment, diagnosis, and differential diagnosis of substance use disorders (including psychological testing and assessment with the MMPI-2, MAC, AUI, MAST, and others); and treatment models and modalities for substance abusing and chemically dependent clients. 

 

PSY 7880 Psychopharmacology     3 credits
This is a required course which all clinical students must complete at University of the Rockies or through transfer credit. This course includes an examination of basic neurobiology, the brain, CNS, and biologic models of major psychiatric illness. Students examine in-depth the clinical uses, mechanisms of action, therapeutic efficacy, side effects, and other practical and clinical issues associated with psychotropic medications. These medications, designed to treat mental illness, include anti-depressants, mood stabilizers, anti-anxiety agents, and anti-psychotic medications. This course also examines the match between different clinical subgroups and various psychotropic medications, as well as the complex relationships between substance abusing or chemically dependent patients and psychopharmacologic treatments. Prerequisites: PSY 5410, PSY 5520 and PSY 7480, or equivalents. 

 

PSY 7940 Advanced & Multivariate Statistical Analysis     3 credits
This course builds on the foundation covered in PSY 5400. The focus is on multivariate techniques commonly used in psychological research, such as factorial analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, repeated measures analysis of variance, multivariate analysis of variance, multiple regression, factor analysis, canonical correlation, and other multivariate techniques. The emphasis is skill-building and conceptual understanding, with exposure to a variety of procedures, so students gain a solid understanding of the reasoning/logic behind statistical procedures. Extensive use of statistical software packages (e.g., SPSS, R) will help illustrate techniques and concepts. This course prepares students to analyze and interpret data collected for the dissertation. Prerequisites: PSY 5400.

 

PSY 7950 Theories & Methods of Supervision & Consultation     3 credits
This course is designed as an interactive experience including a variety of exercises, group discussions, debates, and observations of supervision. The course prepares participants for a variety of therapy settings including private practice, agencies, and academia. The following critical areas of knowledge and skills are addressed: major models of supervision, development of a personal model of supervision, co-evolving therapist-client and supervisor’s relationships, issues in supervision, and ethical and legal considerations related to supervision. Students are also acquainted with best practices for consulting in agency settings. Prerequisite: 1 of the Practicum courses must have been taken at University of the Rockies, and students must have done at least one term of Practicum in the Rockies Counseling Center.

 

PSY 7961–7965 Clinical Practicum     1 credit (each)
Students obtain direct clinical experience during participation in the provision of psychological services. Students provide clinical services in the form of psychotherapy and psychological assessment to a broad range of clients in collaboration with, and under the supervision of, licensed psychologists. Students receive both individual and group supervision from licensed psychologists. This clinical practicum is conducted in the Rockies Counseling Center or at a site approved by the Director of Clinical Training. 

 

PSY 7971–7975 Clinical Practicum     1 credit (each)
Students obtain direct clinical experience during participation in the provision of psychological services. Students provide clinical services in the form of psychotherapy and psychological assessment to a broad range of clients in collaboration with, and under the supervision of, licensed psychologists. Students receive both individual and group supervision from licensed psychologists. This clinical practicum is conducted in the Rockies Counseling Center or at a site approved by the Director of Clinical Training. Prerequisite: PSY 7962-7965.

 

PSY 7981–7985 Clinical Practicum (100 Hours, 1 Term)     1 credit (each)
Students obtain direct clinical experience during participation in the provision of psychological services. Students provide clinical services in the form of psychotherapy and psychological assessment to a broad range of clients in collaboration with, and under the supervision of, licensed psychologists. Students receive both individual and group supervision from licensed psychologists. This clinical practicum is conducted in the Rockies Counseling Center or at a site approved by the Director of Clinical Training. Prerequisites: PSY 7971-7975 and PSY 7220, PSY 7340 and PSY 7540.

 

PSY 8110 Neuropsychological Assessment     3 credits
This course focuses on the theory and practice of neuropsychological assessment and how behavior can be measured to provide information regarding brain functioning. Primary emphasis is on neuropsychological assessment using the Halstead-Reitan and other single or comprehensive batteries. Secondary emphasis is given to instruments used for neuropsychological screening and to illuminate abilities in specific areas of brain functioning. The student learns how these tests are used to provide assessments and recommendations in clinical practice. Prerequisites: PSY 5610, PSY 7340, PSY 7220, PSY 7480, or equivalents.

 

PSY 8150 Trauma Assessment     3 credits
This course examines the various subjective and objective measures of trauma and victimization. This course is especially useful for those who will be conducting clinical work with traumatized clients. Prerequisites: PSY 5610, PSY 7340, and PSY 7220.

 

PSY 8160 Forensic Assessment     3 credits
Students examine the forensic application of traditional assessment instruments such as MMPI-II, Rorschach, and MCMI-III. This course also acquaints the student with specific forensic instruments such as the Hare Psychopathy Checklist, Multiphasic Sex Inventory, and risk assessment instruments. Students have the opportunity to administer and interpret a number of forensic measures and apply the results in clinical situations. Prerequisites: PSY 5610, PSY 7340, and PSY 7220.

 

PSY 8170 Neurofeedback Assessment & Treatment     3 credits
This course introduces the student to converging trends that have influenced the development of applied biofeedback/ psychophysiology. Major antecedents in classical and operant conditioning, psychophysiology, behavioral medicine, and electroencephalography will be examined, as well as the key role that CNS arousal patterns play in the genesis and etiology of various brain-based disorders. The primary focus of the course is on neurofeedback (NF), and offers the student a decidedly hands-on opportunity for learning how to: 1) become a competent NF technician; and 2) gain familiarity with the clinical skills that comprise the basics of choosing NF protocols individually tailored for patients with a variety of medical and psychological maladies.

 

PSY 8185 Pediatric Neuropsychology     3 credits
This course focuses on the theory and practice of pediatric neuropsychology and its distinctions from adult neuropsychology. Thus, emphasis is given to the unique practical considerations in assessing the child/adolescent, to ensure that data collection is valid and free from unnecessary confounding factors. The student is also exposed to a variety of common neurological conditions such as TBI, sports concussion, Autistic Spectrum, toxic exposure, Reactive Attachment Disorder, etc. In addition, introduction and hands-on practice with the administration, scoring, and interpretation of a thorough pediatric neuropsychological battery is provided. The student furthermore gains supervised experience in writing meaningful clinical reports and with regard to treatment planning. Lastly, practical information on how to provide effective assessment feedback to parents/caretakers is supplied. Prerequisites: PSY 5610, PSY 7340, PSY 7220, and PSY 7480.

 

PSY 8190 Sport Neuropsychology     3 credits
Sport Neuropsychology covers the application of neuropsychological understanding to the world of sport, with a particular emphasis on concussion assessment and management. Topics will include epidemiology of concussions, on field and post-concussion assessment, concussion management, and counseling issues related to concussions and neuropsychology. Students will develop knowledge and expertise in concussion recognition and management. Prerequistites: PSY 7480 and PSY 8110.

 

PSY 8310 Correctional Mental Health: Theory & Practice     3 credits
Correctional Mental Health covers the application of mental health theory and practice to jail and prison settings, with a particular emphasis on identifying and treating mental illness for those who are incarcerated. Topics will include legislative and court battles that established correctional mental health, suicide prevention, components of mental health treatment in correctional systems and facilities, and issues related to the provision of psychotherapy in jails and prisons. Students will develop the knowledge and expertise that will enable them to practice effectively in correctional systems.

 

PSY 8540 Forensic Psychology     3 credits

This course is designed to acquaint the student with psychological services provided to the criminal and civil justice systems. Emphasis is placed on the role of psychologists in correctional institutions, the assessment of juvenile and adult offenders, consultation with various law enforcement agencies, criminal profiling, and mental health law. Prerequisite: PSY 5280 or equivalent.

 

PSY 8620 Advanced Seminar in Marriage & Family Therapy     3 credits
This course is for students with significant experience in marriage and family therapy and explores the cutting edge research and theory in the field. Students have the opportunity to build theory and create and develop marriage and family interventions. Prerequisites: PSY 6160, PSY 6600, PSY 8600, and PSY 8610, or equivalents.

 

PSY 8720 Seminar in Eating Disorders     3 credits
This course provides a survey of the origins and treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, the proposed category binge eating disorder, and compulsive overeating/obesity. Students gain expertise in assessment procedures, diagnostic considerations, and the latest treatment techniques effective with clients who have severe disturbances in eating behavior. Case studies, role-plays, and independent research prepare students to excel in the treatment of eating disorders. Prerequisites: PSY 7360, PSY 7210 or equivalents.

 

PSY 8730 Assessment and Treatment of Eating Disorders     3 credits
This course acquaints students with various methods of assessment in eating disorder treatment and allows for practice in their usage. In addition, the course focuses on the mastery of evidence-based treatment, both inpatient and outpatient, in the areas of psycho-education, cognitive-behavioral, interpersonal, self-psychology, feminist, group, family, and self-help. Students have ample opportunity to practice these techniques through readings, class discussion, role-plays, and structured exercises. Prerequisites: PSY 7360, PSY 7210 or equivalents.

 

PSY 8770 Doctoral Capstone Seminar     4 credits (9 weeks)
This seminar provides students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in their curriculum to highly realistic case studies related to their fields of specialization for the doctorate. Through an asynchronous discussion among students and the instructor, students will review, analyze and evaluate case studies emphasizing the practice of the content in their curriculum. The course will involve the analysis and evaluation of one or more case studies. Students will contemplate complex questions posed by their instructor, reply to those questions, respond to other students’ analyses and evaluations, and receive faculty feedback. Each student will submit a final assignment on each case, involving his or her critical thinking on the core issues presented in the case and the presentation and defense of an approach to addressing those core issues. Prerequisite: completion (including approved credits transferred) of all coursework required in the student’s doctoral curriculum.Cross-listed and equivalent to ORG 8770.

 

PSY 8812 Theory & Practice of Hypnosis and Relaxation Therapy     3 credits
This course introduces the student to the history, theories and practice of hypnosis and related clinical methodologies. Traditional hypnoanalytic, hypnotherapeutic, as well as Ericksonian, psychological and medical approaches are presented.

 

PSY 8820 Health Psychology     3 credits
This course explores the major theories and techniques of health psychology, behavioral medicine, psychoneuroimmunology, and body-mind approaches to healing and health care. Psychodynamic theories and the theories of Reich and Lowen; biofeedback and behavioral theories; humanistic, Eastern, and body-mind theories are explored, as well as the works of Borysenko, Ornish, Siegel, and Weil. Current theoretical approaches and research related to the field are explored.

 

PSY 8821 Major Illnesses: Health Psychology’s Role     3 credits
Purpose of this course is to familiarize the students with major medical illness, disease progression, and the contribution of life-style to disease etiology, prevention, wellness, and quality of life. Treatment issues are reviewed only by way of illustrating problems of compliance or adherence once an illness is diagnosed and treatment has begun. Case illustrations will be used to describe the health psychology approach to etiology, assessment, treatment planning, treatment tools and modalities, and the multidisciplinary environment that the health psychologist functions within.

 

PSY 8822 Treatment Approaches in Health Psychology     3 credits
This course explores major theories and techniques of health psychology treatment, behavioral medicine, psycho-neuroimmunology, and body-mind approaches to health and health care. Biofeedback, stress management/relaxation training, behavioral management approaches, guided imagery, autogenic phrases/progressive relaxation, hypnosis, meditation / yoga / acupuncture, massage/body work, pain management, flotation REST, spirituality and health, relationship/social support and health, and other related treatment approaches will be explored. The work of health psychology /behavioral medicine professionals such as Neil Miller, Dean Omish, Bernie Siegel, Andrew Weil, and Joan Borysenko along with current theoretical approaches and research related to the field are explored. Prerequisite: PSY 8820.

 

PSY 8823 Medical Ethics in Health Psychology     3 credits
This course is devoted to learning about the practice of psychology in the health care environment dealing with medical illnesses whether integrated or non-integrated. Emphasis is placed on ethical issues in health psychology and behavioral medicine.

 

PSY 8830 Pain Management I: Overview     3 credits
The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the major medical illnesses which are accompanied by chronic pain and the contribution of the biopsychosocial model to understanding the phenomena of chronic pain. A major focus of this course is developing an awareness of the phenomenology of chronic pain and the mind-body connection, psychological co-morbidities, the etiology of chronic pain, its prevention, and its impact on the quality of life. Case illustrations will be used to describe medical psychology’s approach to assessment, treatment planning, and the treatment of chronic pain. Instructor approval or PSY 8820 is required to take this course. It is also recommended the student have completed PSY 5410 prior to enrolling in this course. A clinical exposure to typical patients will be available at the University of the Rockies Neuropsychology Center or other community settings as part of the student’s practicum. Students will be expected to attend Clinical Grand Rounds at the Clinic or Hospital where they are doing their practicum as part of this Advanced Seminar.

 

PSY 8831 Pain Management II: Specialty Concerns     3 credits
This second course, in a series developed in conjunction with the American Academy of Pain Management (AAPM), helps develop a clear understanding of the medical psychologist’s role on the chronic pain treatment team. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the other major Heath Care Professionals (HCP) management of chronic pain. Students will tour other facilities, interact with other HCP’s, and discuss these specialists’ perceived roles in the management of chronic pain. For example, it is expected students will become familiar with the role of surgery, chiropractic, physical therapy, acupuncture, anesthesiology, and nursing in the management of chronic pain. Students will be taught how to introduce the biopsychosocial model to these specialists to assist them in understanding the phenomena of chronic pain. Students will be expected to become comfortable in interacting with a wide range of medical professionals and understand the limits and scope of practice of the psychologist in the treatment of chronic pain. Instructor approval or PSY 8820 is required to take this course. It is also recommended the student have completed PSY 5410 prior to enrolling in this course. A clinical exposure to patients will be available at community settings as part of the student’s practicum. Students will be expected to attend Clinical Grand Rounds at the Clinic or Hospital where they are doing their practicum as part of this Advanced Seminar.

 

PSY 8850 Advanced Treatment of Trauma Based Disorders     3 credits
This is largely an experiential course. Students demonstrate competence using innovative treatment methods for clients who present with the symptoms of psychological trauma. The methods include therapeutic breathing, examples from energy psychology (TAT, EFT, TFT), the HeartMath biofeedback procedures, applied kinesiology, and strategies for increasing hemispheric balance. Writing assignments include case notes from client sessions, and logs that describe have self-applied the methods. Prerequisites: PSY 7360, PSY 7210 and PSY 5290.

 

PSY 8861 Treating the Traumatic Origins of Complex Emotional Disorders I (EMDR-II)     3 credits
Students in this course will review the current literature, research, ethics, and practice related to trauma treatment with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). Students will learn and practice EMDR through role plays, and in two or more practicum experiences with real-life problems. Students will demonstrate minimal competence in using EMDR in a therapist role, and will receive treatment in a client role, with a single-incident trauma or disturbing memory. Prerequisites: PSY 7360, PSY 7210 and PSY 5290.

  

PSY 8880 Treating the Traumatic Origins of Complex Emotional Disorders II (EMDR- II)     3 credits
The course begins with a review of PSY 8861, and of students’ experiences in using EMDR with clinical clients. Students will demonstrate minimal competence in using EMDR in a therapist role, and will receive treatment in a client role, with real-life presenting problems. In addition to demonstrating competence in treating traumatic memories and anxiety, students will also be expected to show effective use of EMDR with one or more of the following problems: recent traumatic events, dilemma, phobia, physical pain, cognitive and emotional interferences with achievement, disturbing dreams, and grief. Prerequisite: PSY 8861.

 

PSY 8910 Dissertation Planning I     1 credit (9 weeks)
In this course students begin drafting their dissertation under instructor supervision. Students working individually on their dissertation drafts focus on the description of their topic, refinement of their research questions, and outlining their review of the literature with feedback and recommendations for revisions from their instructor. (Final approval of these drafts of portions of the dissertation rests with the student’s individual dissertation committees, as described in the current University of the Rockies Dissertation Handbook, as revised from time to time. Following the procedures outlined in the Handbook, students may form their committees before, during, or after their enrollment and completion of Dissertation Planning I and II.) Prerequisite: Doctoral Capstone Seminar. Cross-listed and equivalent to EDU/HUM/ORG 8910.

 

PSY 8912 Dissertation Planning II     1 credit (9 weeks)
In this course students continue drafting their dissertation from Dissertation Planning I under instructor supervision. Students working individually on their own dissertation drafts focus on further refinement of the description of their topic, the final draft wording of their research questions, and beginning to write their review of the literature and research methodology with feedback and recommendations for revisions from their instructor. Students will exchange research concepts and proposed approaches about their research methodology with other students proposing similar methods (qualitative, quantitative, mixed, action). Final approval of these drafts of portions of the dissertation rests with the student’s individual dissertation committees, as described in the current University of the Rockies Dissertation Handbook, as revised from time to time. Following the procedures outlined in the Handbook, students may form their committees before, during or after their enrollment and completion of Dissertation Planning I and II. Prerequisite: completion of all required coursework and Dissertation Planning I. Cross-listed and equivalent to EDU/HUM/ORG 8912.

 

PSY 8951, 8952, & 8953 Independent Studies     1 to 3 credits each
Independent studies are options for students who would like to pursue further study in an area of psychology not offered in the curriculum. Students enrolled in Independent Study receive instruction from a faculty member who is qualified in the specific area of choice. Students are limited to three independent studies during the program.

 

PSY 8980 Pre-Doctoral Internship (1500 Hours; 1 credit per term, 5 terms)     1 credit
The Internship year provides students with an intensive clinical experience building upon coursework, Practicum experiences, and supervision skills obtained during the first three years of coursework. Through their own investigation and with the assistance of the Internship Director at University of the Rockies, students obtain approved Internship sites either locally or at a distance to provide them with an opportunity to exercise clinical skills in their area of specialization or in general psychotherapy. Students are immersed during the Internship experience in a clinical setting that allows them to work full time in the field of psychology and therefore prepares them for a career in psychology. Students may refer to the Internship Handbook for detailed information regarding Internship requirements. All Internships must meet APPIC requirements. Prerequisites: 15 hours of Clinical Practicum and Passing of Doctoral Comprehensive Examination.

 

PSY 8990 Dissertation (1 credit per term, 5 terms)     1 credit
Students writing a dissertation must complete a total of 5 credits by registering for five consecutive terms of dissertation credit, one credit per term. Dissertations are written per the policies, practices and procedures in the Dissertation Handbook. Clinical program students register for dissertation after they complete PSY 7620, Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology.

 

PSY 8991 Dissertation Extension     1 credit
When Dissertation extends beyond 5 credit hours or one year in length, students must register in Dissertation Extension consecutively until the Dissertation is complete.


RES Research

RES 5240 Research Methods    3 credits
This course involves the study of research design, and the quantitative and qualitative methods that can be used in addressing research questions. Students will be introduced to social scientific inquiry and the research design process, as well as some of the most common quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. Through the process of critiquing research articles, students will learn how to determine the appropriate use of research design, recognize errors and biases in conducting research, and communicate the methods and results of particular studies. Equivalent to HUM 6405. Cross-listed and equivalent to ORG 6405/PSY 6405.

 

RES 7400 Research Design & Methods – Quantitative    3 credits
This course involves the advanced study of research design, and the quantitative methods that can be used in addressing research questions. Students will gain experience developing their own research ideas and learning how to select and apply appropriate research designs to test those ideas. Through the process of critiquing research articles, students will also learn how to evaluate which research designs would be appropriate to test various areas of inquire, as well as how to communicate the methods and results of particular quantitative studies. Students will be required to complete a training on ethics in research, as well as complete a quantitative research proposal in an area of interest, which may include dissertation related research. Cross-listed and equivalent to ORG 7400.

 

RES 7410 Research Design & Methods – Qualitative    3 credits
This course involves the advanced study of research design, in general, and the qualitative inquiry, in particular, that can be used in addressing research questions. The epistemological assumptions underlying the qualitative methodology will be explored as students become familiar with the philosophical issues underlying how we know what we know. The ability to choose a researchable topic and create associated research questions will be emphasized. Students will become familiar with a variety of approaches including ethnography, grounded theory, phenomenology, narrative, participatory action research, and case study. A variety of common data collection methods will be studied, such as observation, interviews, surveys, and historical document collection. Validation and reliability standards, as well as evaluation criteria for qualitative approaches will be addressed. Students will be required to complete training on ethics in research, as well as complete a qualitative research proposal in an area of interest, which may include dissertation related research. Cross-listed and equivalent to ORG 7410. 

 

RES 7415 Advanced Statistics     3 credits
This course emphasizes inferential statistical concepts related to methods most appropriate to data and theories. The focus is on a quantitative approach to the concepts and methods of statistical inference. Topics include hypothesis testing, probability, multiple correlation and regression, t-tests, Analysis of Variance, Analysis of Covariance, and Multivariate Analysis of Variance, and nonparametric tests. Research design issues are addressed, with a focus on selecting data analysis techniques to appropriately address research questions and apply the concepts covered to various research problems and real life situations. Emphasis is on developing skills for interpreting statistical results presented in scholarly research articles. Prerequisite for PhD: RES 7410. Additional prerequisite for PhD ODL: ORG7402 . Prerequisite for PsyD: ORG 7402. Cross-listed and equivalent to ORG/ PSY 7415.

 

RES 7420 Advanced Study in Mixed Research Methods    3 credits
Students with an interest in mixed methodology or with a desire to utilize this methodology for their respective doctoral dissertation will be given the opportunity to greatly expand their knowledge base on both qualitative and quantitative methodology and ultimately, the juxtaposition of the two into one project. Students may elect to begin working on a preliminary proposal for their doctoral dissertation (or select and explore a topic of interest that may become the dissertation topic) for the culminating project in this course. Prerequisite: RES 7400 and RES 7410.

 

RES 7430 Action Research    3 credits
Action research is a reflective process of collaborative, participatory problem solving. This course addresses the processes and procedures for conducting action research, as well as how to develop an action research plan. Students will attain a conceptual and applied understanding of action research methods and the skills to use these methods to transform an organization through data driven decision making. Students will be able to critically analyze and design action research projects, collect and analyze data, interpret results, and articulate action research principles as a leader in relevant contexts. Prerequisite: RES 7400 and RES 7410.

 

RES 7440 Advanced Study in Qualitative Research    3 credits
Students with interest in qualitative research, or with a desire to utilize this methodology for their respective doctoral dissertation, will be given an opportunity to greatly expand their existing knowledge base on qualitative research methodology. Students may elect to begin working on a preliminary proposal for their doctoral dissertation (or select and explore a topic of interest that may become the dissertation topic) for the culminating project in this course. Prerequisite: RES 7400 and RES 7410.

 

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